Fishing

DEC Announces Opening of New York’s 2018 Trout Fishing Season

Residents and Tourists Encouraged to Catch Wild and Stocked Trout throughout State


DEC to Stock 2.26 Million Catchable-Size Trout in New York Waters
State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos today announced that this year’s trout fishing season in New York opens on Sunday, April 1. Supporting the State’s growing sport fishing industry with an estimated $1.8 billion in economic activity each year, DEC will stock 2.26 million catchable-size trout in 315 lakes and ponds and roughly 2,845 miles of streams across the state. Anglers should visit DEC’s website for a list of stocked waters and the 2018 Coldwater Fishing Forecast for recommended trout and salmon fishing locations.

DEC Commissioner Seggos said, “Good stewardship and improved water quality has resulted in an increase wild trout abundance in many waters across the State. Learning the habits and needs of wild trout contributes to angling success and a deeper appreciation of the resource and I encourage anglers to experience these fisheries.”

DEC’s spring stockings will include 1.72 million brown trout, 377,500 rainbow trout, and 158,500 brook trout. Approximately 97,000 two-year-old brown trout 13 to 14 inches in length will also be stocked into lakes and streams across the state. These fish will provide enhanced angling experiences for the estimated 647,000 anglers that fish for trout in New York

Although fishing conditions can be less than optimal during the early season, conditions will improve as the weather warms. 

Trout

New York also provides some of the finest backwoods brook trout fishing in the northeast. These opportunities are most abundant in the Adirondacks, where more than 500 waters are managed for brook trout. Fish in these waters can weigh more than three pounds. In 2018, more than 310,000 brook trout fingerlings will be stocked in 345 lakes and ponds in the Adirondacks during the spring and fall to restore or enhance brook trout populations. Anglers new to brook trout fishing should look to the Guide to Brook Trout Fishing in Adirondack Pondsfor assistance.

DEC also provides maps of its public fishing rights easements. Anglers are reminded to observe special trout regulations on waters noted in the current fishing guide. Additional information on places to fish for wild and stocked trout is available on DEC’s website.

For beginning or youth anglers, ponds are easiest to fish, particularly during the early season. Information about where and how to fish, including a new highly effective technique for early season trout, can be found on the DEC’s website.

Fishing License Required
Anyone 16 years of age and older must have a current State fishing license to fish in New York. Fishing licenses are now valid for 365 days from the date of purchase. More information on purchasing a fishing license can be found on DEC’s website.

License purchasers are reminded that by law, every dollar spent on a fishing license helps fund fish stocking and other programs conducted by the Bureau of Fisheries. Please also consider purchasing a Habitat/Access Stamp which helps fund important access and habitat improvement projects. For more information on the Habitat/Access Stamp program visit DEC’s website.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/38329.html
 

http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/38329.html

 

The Long Lake Fish and Game Club stock the “Golden Trout”

Check out maps, locations for fishing and general info about fishing in Raquette Lake & Long Lake here. 

https://mylonglake.com/what-2-do/fish-game/

Fishing Licenses available in Long Lake at Hoss’s Country Corner. Call 518-624-2481.

Fishing Derby and Open House in Long Lake NY

Long Lake Annual Bass and Pike Opening Day Derby will be on Saturday, June 17th with launch from the Long Lake Town Beach, located at 1258 Main Street.  Registration is held from 6am – 6:30am and is $25 per person. Cash prizes are awarded for fish caught in Long Lake including Pike, Largemouth & Small mouth Bass.  Weigh in is 3pm – 3:30pm at the Long Lake Town Beach.

Fishing Licenses, equipment & bait available at Hoss’s Country Corner

Equipment also available at the ADK Trading Post

Also on June 17th from 9am – 6pm the Long Lake Fish & Game Club will be hosting an Open House at 8196 Newcomb Rd.  Food, live music and shooting events will be on the docket. All are welcome to attend and check out the expanding facilities.  

A great day of recreation and sporting events in Long Lake, NY in the heart of the Adirondacks.  

 

 

Lake Eaton Ice Fishing Derby

Update on Conditions:

Event Organizers on Friday, Feb 12th say LAKE EATON DERBY is STILL ON. After mild conditions, winter weather has finally arrived. Weather temps will be -10F during day with -22 to – 30 wind chill. Hamilton County is under a wind chill warning. A wind chill warning means the combo of cold air and winds will create dangerously low wind chill values. This could result in frost bite, hypothermia if precautions not taken. Bundle up, layer and be prepared. The Long Lake Warming Hut/Weigh in station will be available for contestants to warm up. 4-wheelers and snowmobiles will be allowed on lake, but no trucks.

The Long Lake Fish and Game Club will be sponsoring an Ice Fishing Derby on Lake Eaton on Saturday, February 13th, 2016 from 7am until 3pm. Registration will open at 6am to 7am at the Mt. Sabattis Geiger Arena and Rink located at 6 Pavilion Way, entrance located across from the Long Lake Post Office on Deerland Road, NYS Route 30/28N in Long Lake, NY. The derby will take place via the Lake Eaton Campsite located at 1671 Tupper Road, NYS Route 30, Long Lake, NY 12847.

Ice Fishing Derby on Lake Eaton for Land-locked Salmon or trout

Ice Fishing Derby on Lake Eaton for Land-locked Salmon or trout

Registration is $25 a person. All contestants must have a valid NYS DEC fishing license. Prizes will be awarded for Land-locked Salmon, Lake Trout, and all other species of trout. Fishing at Lake Eaton will start at 7am and finish at 3pm. Last weigh in will be at the Lake Eaton Boat Launch at 3:15pm. This is a live-weigh in by weight first and length second in the event of a tie-breaker. Registration will be on-going throughout the day at the Lake Eaton Campsite Boat Launch and at the ADK Trading Post located at 1601 Tupper Road. Contestant numbers will be issued for Door Prizes and contestants must be present to win.

The awards will be given at the Long Lake Diner starting at 4pm.

The Long Lake Fish and Game Club will have coffee, hot chocolate and snacks at the weigh-in booth.

For updated information, ice conditions and more please check mylonglake.com or facebook.com/mylonglake or call 518-624-3077.

Registration and Rules

Lake-Eaton-Ice-Fishing-Derby

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Kids Fishing Derbies June 6 & June 20th

The Long Lake Kids Fishing Derby will take place on Saturday, June 6th at Jennings Park Pond, across from the Long Lake Town Beach off of NYS Route 30. It’s between Raquette River Outfitters and the Adirondack Hotel. Kids fish all along the shoreline of the pond, and can even set up along the Nature Trail, a walking path winding around the pond connecting the Beach to the Long Lake Ball Field. Check out the path and find a cozy, secluded spot to fish.

Fun on the Nature Trail around Jennings Park Pond.

Fun on the Nature Trail around Jennings Park Pond.

Fish for trout, bullhead, sunnies or whatever else you find in the pond. Ages/categories/largest fish prizes for trout, bullhead, sunfish, trout and sometimes weeds! Look up and see if you can catch your bobber on the power line, one year there was even a sneaker tied up around the wires above the causeway!

Look for great prizes for the kids. Everyone always walks away with something be it new fishing gear, lures, tackle boxes and fishing poles to gift certificates to local businesses.

And if that sparks your interest save the date, June 20th, Bass Fishing Opening Day, to head over to Raquette Lake, NY for the Junior Members Fishing Derby will be held on Raquette Lake for opening Day of bass season on Raquette Lake all day. Prizes and hot dogs for everyone! Call 315-354-4581 for more info.

Fishing is a great way to get outside, and connect with the water, mother nature and of course.. the elusive FISH! Now the question is… where is the best fishing hole on Raquette Lake? Anyone? We’ll just have to give it a try ourselves!

Enjoy snacks and sodas donated by the LL Fish and Game Club.

Registration is free and open to anyone.

Event from 9am – 3pm. See you there!

The Big Bass of Raquette – An Adirondack Fish Tale

The Town of Long Lake Parks, Recreation & Tourism Department recently received an account about a big bass caught in Raquette Lake. The editing team (of one) decided to let the readers of the online Long Lake, NY blog Mountain Times read all about it. Normally an Adirondack fish story is exchanged at a local watering hole around 3pm. Sometimes the tale is passed on to the local bait point person who gets to share the story while stocking the walls of a cavernous, rustic, tree-filled, pickle-barreled talking, creeky floored store. The salesperson, wearing a t-shirt and teva’s, will stand before a wall festoooned with brightly colored fishing lures and woo the customer with the latest jargon and top secret information about local fishing spots. This highly classified information will include in-depth descriptions about the deepest, darkest depths of the lakes and the coldest running water and the super-top-double-secret-probation fishing spots. (which may or may not be true) So this first hand truthful account, delivered via email to Long Lake, is much appreciated. Thanks to Michael Corazon for his first hand The Big Bass of Raquette – An Adirondack Fish Tale.

Article Submitted by Michael Corazon
After sleeping in the first 2 days of my trip to the Adirondacks trip in New York state, I decided to get myself out on Raquette Lake on August 4, 2012, and try my luck fishing. After trolling and casting lures from a boat for two hours I couldn’t find any hungry takers so I returned to the dock at the “Vigilante” camp at the Greylock Association and unloaded some gear. Before heading up to the car I took a look over the side of the dock and into the clear and shallow water and saw what I first thought to be a lake trout swimming out from under the dock. With my eyes bugging out of my head I then realized the huge fish that had me open jawed was actually a very good size largemouth bass. As I scrambled to get my rod rigged with a lure for that shallow water casting situation, I lost sight of the fish that had swam in the direction of the “Stuchiner” dock.

I then made several casts that way but came up empty. Now, not knowing where the bass actually was had me thinking I missed my chance so I again gathered up my gear and started to head off the dock. I then took another look in the water to my left and to my surprise the lunker bass was now swimming parallel to the shoreline and back in my direction where it then disappeared under the dock I was standing on.

In my mind the situation had now gone critical as I again scrambled for a lure that would compliment a presentation in 2 – 3 feet of water along side the docks edge. I went into my plastic bait box and choose a crayfish imitation jig for the job. I then dragged and popped the lure along the bottom all around the docks edge, but after many minutes of fishing there was no sign of the fish. In my prior haste to find and attach the lure I could not be certain that I hadn’t missed seeing the bass swim away from the dock. Without knowledge of whether or not the fish was even still there I was now about ready to call it quits. I then decided to fish one last time on the side of the dock from where the fish had originally swam out from. With the lure a few feet from where I would be finally calling my jigging operation quits for good, the “hawg” suddenly and magically appeared and had its mouth over the plastic jig. I then reared back on the 7 foot pole and had the biggun on.

The battle had now erupted as I tried to keep the bass close to the dock and out of harms way of running around the dock posts. I managed to keep the brute near the surface of the water where it jumped a few times as I prayed that the jig hook would not come out. With my net in the boat and out of reach, I was able to bend over the dock edge and hold the rod high while applying upward pressure to the fish while I tried for a mouth grab with my left hand. Lots of missed attempts later I finally had the mouth of the fish in my grasp as I lifted it from the water at the docks edge. The lunker largemouth was now mine.

This fish is not only my best ever bass catch from Raquette Lake, but also my lifetime personal best freshwater bass. Here is a picture of the catch where you can see Beecher Island in the backround.

Michael Corazon ( Greylock Association / Raquette Lake, NY )

Ice Out, Fish On: Adirondack Fishing, Long Lake NY

Fishing is a year round sport in the Adirondacks and both Long Lake and Raquette Lake should be included on your Adirondack fishing destination list for 2016. In 2009 the largest Brook Trout in New York State was caught in Raquette Lake and we’re pretty sure there are more where that came from.

Fishing the waters of Long Lake and Raquette Lake is fishing in pristine surroundings. It’s fishing in solitude. It’s fishing in a place where heritage strains of trout are still found in the hidden depths of some of our bodies of water.

Long Lake is a widening of the Raquette River and is 14 miles long, a size of about 3904 Acres. The Mean Depth is 13 feet and an average depth of Long Lake ranges from 15-28 feet and at it’s deepest it boasts a depth of over 40 feet at a hole located at the north end of Long Lake, but if you don’t know where it is, you’ll have to come up and ask a local, because everyone likes to keep their favorite fishing spots a secret.

Long Lake is home to Largemouth Bass, Smallmouth Bass, Northern Pike, Brown Bullhead, Yellow Perch and Brook Trout.

Raquette Lake boasts over 100 miles of shoreline with lots of bays and nooks and crannies to find a spot to drop a line. The lake is the second largest natural lake in the Adirondacks and is approximately six miles long, with a maximum depth of just under 100 feet. It is also the source of the Raquette River.

Raquette Lake is home to the following species of fish brook trout, lake trout, smallmouth bass, largemouth bass, landlocked salmon, northern pike, chain pickerel, perch and bullhead. This lake is stocked yearly with lake trout and brook trout.

Freshwater fishing trips can be a great way to enjoy the abundance of lakes, rivers and streams of the Long Lake, NY region. Long Lake is located in the Adirondacks in Upstate New York, two-hours north of Albany, three hours south of Montreal and a days drive from New York City or Western New York.

Planning ahead is always a good idea. Pick up fishing gear at area stores, in Long Lake Hoss’s Country Corner is located at the intersection of NYS Route 30 and 28N and the ADK Trading Post will offer live bait, lures, and a wide variety of fishing equipment for the whole family. Not to mention bug dope. Yes, it’s true, we’re not saying it’s super fun to be here during the height of bug season (which doesn’t arrive until Mid to late May and ends mid-June, depending on the season) but we are saying it requires a certain amount of fortitude to withstand the critters, so arriving during early Trout Season which opens April 1st, is always a good idea. We say beat the bugs! Or Don’t fear the bugs. They aren’t as bad as the Green Heads that attack on the Jersey Shore (just sayin’)

Fishing Licenses can be purchased at at Hoss’s Country Corner. Call 518-624-2481 for hours.

Spring Fishing in the Adirondacks and Long Lake and Raquette Lake is always a terrific time to get out on the water. The crowds are light and the private fishing areas are plentiful and blissfully serene. Many area ponds, lakes and streams are stocked with fish.

For a boat rental contact Long Lake Marina, call ahead. The ice is out early this season, but if you are looking for a smallish water craft, call and they will arrange to put one in the water for you. If it’s one thing we have up here in the spring, it’s good customer service, you’ll get the attention you need and all your questions answered. www.longlakemarina.com at 518-624-2266 or in Raquette Lake, www.birdsboats.com Bird’s Marina 315-354-4441 or Burke’s Marina www.burkesmarinainc.com at 315-354-4623

Fishing is an unsurpassed Adirondack outdoor recreational activity for all ages. Kids under the age of 16 don’t need a fishing license. New York fishing licenses for those over the age of 16 are currently $29 annually for New York residents. Residents over the age of 70 pay just $5 annually. If you are out of state, the rates are a bit higher, call our local licensing office or check out NYS DEC website.

Long Lake and Raquette Lake offer unique boat access rental properties, motels, hotels, cottages and cabins on the lake which are ideal for a fishing expedition. For information about cabins or cottages on Long Lake or check out what’s available on the Raquette Lake Lodging page at Raquette Lake Lodging and for great Long Lake accommodations check out Long Lake Lodging

Lots of fishing regulations for Long Lake and Raquette Lake are listed here. We’ve pulled the most relevant fishing information for our area. Of note: Long Lake and Raquette Lake are located in Hamilton County, NY. Be sure to get a fishing license, fishing regulations booklet and get geared up for a great Adirondack Adventure.

Link to Info on Long Lake Fishing Regulations

Fishing Derbies in 2016
June 4, 2016 Kid’s Fishing Derby sponsored by the Long Lake Fish & Game Club, June 2, 2012 Registration 9:30am across from the Town Beach. Prizes galore and kids fish on a stocked pond.

June 18, 2016 Bass Derby Opening Day, Town Beach, Long Lake. Registration 6:30am. $25 per person. Cash Prizes.

July 9, 2016 Long Lake Bass Derby sponsored by the LL Fish and Game Club. $85 per boat. Registration information email long.lake.fish.game.club@gmail.com or call 518-624-2145

July 23, 2016 Raquette Lake Bass Derby sponsored by the RL Fish and Game Club. $110 per boat. Cash prizes for weight and lunker. 150 registrations max. Breakfast served and first boat launches at 6:30am. No fishing for contestants starting Wednesday before the derby.

The great sport of Adirondack Fishing is ON for family vacations, outdoor recreation and fun. Send us your photos! We’d love to see them!

Please note: LIVE BAIT IS NOT ALLOWED IN LITTLE TUPPER LAKE in the Whitney Wilderness and a Catch and Release policy protects these waters. Please educate yourself on the NYS Catch and Release programs and protect our waters.

Baitfish Regulations for Purchased Baitfish and Green List Baitfish

The following baitfish are the only species that can be purchased and used in any water body in New York where it is legal to use fish as bait. These baitfish are commonly used throughout New York and are not considered to be a threat to other native New York fish species (except for trout in waters where baitfish use is prohibited). Limiting the use of baitfish to the Green List will help prevent the accidental introduction of unwanted species.
• Golden shiner
• Northern redbelly dace
• Emerald shiner
• Blacknose dace
• Common shiner
• Longnose dace
• Spottail shiner
• White sucker
• Banded killifish
• Northern hogsucker
• Fathead minnow
• Creek chub
• Bluntnose minnow
• Fallfish
• Logperch
• Eastern silvery minnow
Use, Possession and Transportation of Purchased Baitfish
Certified Baitfish
Certified baitfish are those that have been tested and found to be free of specified diseases. Use of certified baitfish helps prevent the spread of fish diseases. Certified baitfish purchased from a bait dealer can be transported overland in a motorized vehicle and used on any body of water where it is legal to do so.
For baitfish to be considered certified, the seller must provide a receipt that contains:
• the seller’s name,
• date of sale,
• the species of fish, and
• the number of each species sold.
The buyer must retain that receipt while in possession of the baitfish. Baitfish without a receipt or with a receipt that is older than 10 days shall be considered uncertified bait.

If You Catch a Large Fish
Each year, New York anglers catch a number of trophy-sized fish. If you catch a really big fish, DEC wants to hear about it. You may qualify for an award in our Angler Achievement Awards Program. The program recognizes exceptional catches in several categories: annual award, catch and release, and state record.
An angler whose fish breaks the current state record receives a custom engraved plaque, an Angler Achievement Award lapel pin, and a Certificate of Achievement.
To participate in New York State’s Angler Achievement Awards Program, simply follow these guidelines:
• Fish must be taken by angling in New York State waters in accordance with New York State fishing regulations.
• Fish must meet the minimum qualifying weight or length for that species and the entered category.
• Fish entered in the Annual Award and State Record categories must be weighed on a certified scale by the owner of the scale or an employee, and must be witnessed by at least one other person.
• Fish submitted as a potential State Record entry must be identified by a DEC biologist or a designee.
• Qualifying fish must be entered on an official entry form or facsimile.
• All entries must be accompanied by a clear, sideview photograph of the fish or the angler with the fish.
• Entry forms must be received by DEC’s Bureau of Fisheries within 30 days of the catch.
NYSDEC, Bureau of Fisheries, 625 Broadway, Albany, New York 12233-4753.

Entry forms are available at http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/7727.html
Some information provided here was collected from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation online resource.

Long Lake