Hiking

“I Enjoy Hiking” said every so convincingly!

The first hike was gorgeous, the sun came out just for my hike and I MAY have had a dance party at the top with my dogs. With beautiful views like this how could you not dance a little.

Even with the second hike being a little snowy with almost nothing to see, it had a beauty that was still worth the hike.

 

I enjoy hiking.

I enjoy hiking 3 of the 4 seasons.

I like hiking in the spring when it’s muddy and slippery. I like hiking in the summer when it’s hot and muggy. I REALLY like hiking in the fall when it’s cool and beautiful. But winter, cold and icy? Winter hiking is not my favorite.

It’s cold and you have to wear layers. It’s often so hard to judge how many layers to wear and I usually error on the side of too many layers. Layers which make your body heavy and harder to move. Then add the heavy boots, the gloves, a hat, bulky sweatshirts, long underwear, SNOWSHOES! Suddenly a simple hike, like the mile up Coney Mountain, is a huge production! One I’m never sure is going to be worth it the way the weather is in the Adirondacks.

Nevertheless, I ventured out (twice actually!) with my dogs and did the short mile hike to the beautiful 360 view on Coney that is always worth the hike. As far as hikes go, it’s the biggest bang for your buck; not too steep, not too long, and at this point, very familiar.

As expected I hated it most of the way up but the dogs appreciated it!

 

This post is written by Steph Hample – Events Coordinator for The Town of Long Lake. 

Spring Pond Bog Hike on July 12th

Spring Pond Bog

Boreal Birding

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Join Joan Collins for a hike to scenic Spring Pond Bog.  One of the most popular birding destinations in the Adirondacks and a designated “Important Bird Area” (IBA), Spring Pond Bog is the second largest bog in the New York State.  This Adirondack Nature Conservancy property contains diverse habitats and bird species.  Wetlands, bogs, boreal forest, mixed and deciduous forests, and areas growing back from logging activity, can all be found at this Tupper Lake property.  Spring Pond Bog is a primary study site for Spruce Grouse researchers in the Adirondacks.  Eighteen warbler species breed in this area including Northern Waterthrush, Mourning, Palm, and Canada Warblers.  Other boreal species include Common Loon, Northern Goshawk, Black-backed Woodpecker, Olive-sided, Yellow-bellied, and Alder Flycatchers, Philadelphia Vireo, Gray Jay, Boreal Chickadee, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Lincoln’s Sparrow, and the increasingly rare Spruce Grouse. 

The hiking trail to Spring Pond Bog gradually climbs through a hardwood forest to a glacial esker.  There is a boardwalk loop to the right of the esker that takes visitors into the bog for close-up views of plant and bird life.  The trail is less than a mile long.  We will make a couple other stops and hike along level dirt roads in boreal forest within the Spring Pond Bog complex.  Bring food (lunch), water, appropriate attire/hiking shoes, binoculars, hat, sunscreen, and insect spray.  Meet at the Geiger Arena parking area in Long Lake at 7 a.m. for transportation to the trailhead on Long Lake’s “Little Bus”!  There is a restroom at the Geiger Arena.  Register by calling the Long Lake Parks and Recreation Department at 518-624-3077.  This field trip is jointly sponsored by Northern New York Audubon and the Long Lake Parks and Recreation Department.  There is a maximum of 15 participants.

 

Spur Trail Slated for Long Lake, NY

Construction plans for a spur trail from the Northville-Lake Placid Trail connecting to the center of Long Lake is slated to be finished by the fall and ready for use in 2018. The connector trail connects with the Three-Brook Loop Cross Country Ski Trail giving hikers an option for a short-cut into the village of Long Lake go into the town for a stop at the Post Office (located at the base of Mt. Sabattis) eat and even take advantage of multiple lodging options in the commmunity. 

The spur trail will potentially save a lot of hoofing along route 28N, a busy travel corridor between Long Lake and Newcomb.  This gives hikers traveling from the south end of the trail from Blue Mountain a much more convenient opportunity to pop into town for a rejuvenation stop for food, sleep, and replenishment of supplies. 

The section of trail will be partly on state land and partly on property owned by the Town of Long Lake. 

For those hikers not looking to come into town, there will be a bypass to continue on to the northern section of the Northville-Lake Placid trail and avoiding the drop off into town.  

 

This is part of The Adirondack Community-based Trails and Lodging System and the Hamlets to Huts project. 

 

 

 

 

 

Guided Hikes Offered in Long Lake

For the last several years the Town of Long Lake Parks and Recreation Department has offered a unique municipal hiking program with guides Joan Collins, an avid birder, blogger and owner of Adirondack Avian Expeditions, and with Spencer Morrissey, a Long Lake native, also a prolific writer, mountain climber, photographer and Adirondack adventurer.

This unique program was started when the community recognized that there are visitors to the community looking to go on hikes, but may not know just where to start. Joan and Spencer both offer unique points of view, skill and talent. They planned area hikes that are open to everyone, visitors and residents. There is space max of 15 per trip and sign ups must be in advance and folks arriving the day of with out signing up in advance could potentially be turned away.

The Town of Long Lake offers Adirondack Hiking Trips in the summer.

The Town of Long Lake offers Adirondack Hiking Trips in the summer.

To register call Steph Hample at 518.624.3077.

Joan will also be leading expeditions for the Hamilton County Birding Festival coming up June 10-12th. For a schedule click here. Hamilton County Birding Festival 2016

So please sign up, bring the kids, and join us in the Town of Long Lake for some wonderful hiking expeditions. And as always as we do offer these trips for free, we ask that those taking advantage of Long Lake adventures, consider investing some dollars in our local economy too. Purchase local and help sustain our year-round economy.

2016 Hikes with Joan Collins:

Joan Collins Portrait

Spring Pond Bog Hike with Joan Collins sponsored by Long Lake on July 12, 2016

Spring Pond Bog Hike with Joan Collins sponsored by Long Lake on July 12, 2016

Spring Pond Bog
Boreal Birding
Tuesday, July 12th, 2016
Bus Departure at 7am, Long Lake Geiger Arena Parking Lot at Mt. Sabattis, 6 Pavilion Way

Join Joan Collins for a hike to scenic Spring Pond Bog. One of the most popular birding destinations in the Adirondacks and a designated “Important Bird Area” (IBA), Spring Pond Bog is the second largest bog in the New York State. This Adirondack Nature Conservancy property contains diverse habitats and bird species. Wetlands, bogs, boreal forest, mixed and deciduous forests, and areas growing back from logging activity, can all be found at this Tupper Lake property. Spring Pond Bog is a primary study site for Spruce Grouse researchers in the Adirondacks. Eighteen warbler species breed in this area including Northern Waterthrush, Mourning, Palm, and Canada Warblers. Other boreal species include Common Loon, Northern Goshawk, Black-backed Woodpecker, Olive-sided, Yellow-bellied, and Alder Flycatchers, Philadelphia Vireo, Gray Jay, Boreal Chickadee, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Lincoln’s Sparrow, Evening Grosbeak, and the increasingly rare Spruce Grouse. The hiking trail to Spring Pond Bog gradually climbs through a hardwood forest to a glacial esker. There is a boardwalk loop to the right of the esker that takes visitors into the bog for close-up views of plant and bird life. The trail is less than a mile long. Bring food, water, appropriate attire/hiking shoes, binoculars, hat, sunscreen, and insect spray. Meet at the Geiger Arena parking area in Long Lake at 7 a.m. for transportation to the trailhead on Long Lake’s “Little Bus”! There is a restroom at the Geiger Arena meeting location. Register by calling the Long Lake Parks and Recreation Department at 518-624-3077. This field trip is jointly sponsored by Northern New York Audubon and the Long Lake Parks and Recreation Department. There is a maximum of 15 participants. Register by calling the Long Lake Parks and Recreation Department at 518-624-3077. This field trip is jointly sponsored by Northern New York Audubon and the Long Lake Parks and Recreation Department. There is a maximum of 15 participants.

Roosevelt-Truck Trail is an excellent place to explore

Roosevelt-Truck Trail is an excellent place to explore

Roosevelt Truck Trail
Tuesday, August 9, 2016
Bus Departure at 7am, Long Lake Geiger Arena, 6 Pavilion Way

Lovely, mature boreal habitat spans the 2.5 mile long Roosevelt Truck Trail. This wide, road-sized trail runs between Route 28N and the Blue Ridge Road in Minerva. Joan Collins will lead a hike along this route beginning at the Blue Ridge Road trailhead and ending at the Route 28N trailhead. The trail has hilly and level terrain with an overall loss of 100 feet in elevation by the end of our hike. The habitat along the route provides a year-round home to many boreal bird species. Participants will also be looking for animal tracks – Black Bear and Moose tracks are frequently found on this old road. In August, the Roosevelt Truck Trail is a wonderful place to look for mushrooms and lichens. Meet at the Geiger Arena parking area in Long Lake at 7 a.m. for transportation to the trailhead on Long Lake’s “Little Bus”! There is a restroom at the Geiger Arena, and there are two outhouses along the trail at camping locations. Bring food, water, a jacket, appropriate attire/hiking shoes, binoculars, hat, sunscreen, and insect spray. Register by calling the Long Lake Parks and Recreation Department at 518-624-3077. This field trip is jointly sponsored by Northern New York Audubon and the Long Lake Parks and Recreation Department. There is a maximum of 15 participants.

Always a popular fall destination.  Sign up early!  This trip fills up fast.  Leaf Peeping is breathtaking.

Always a popular fall destination. Sign up early! This trip fills up fast. Leaf Peeping is breathtaking.


Low’s Ridge – Upper Dam Trail
Leaf Peeping and Birding!
Saturday, September 24, 2016
Bus Departure at 7am, Long Lake Geiger Arena, Mt. Sabattis, 6 Pavilion Way

Join Joan Collins for a walk into beautiful Hitchins Pond and the Upper Dam on the Bog River. Common Loons nest on Hitchins Pond each year. Bald Eagles and Great Blue Herons are also a common sight. The route is an old dirt road that passes through many lovely and varied habitat areas including a boreal bog, marsh, mixed forest, and ponds/lakes. After the 2.5 mile walk on level terrain to Hitchins Pond, there will be a food break at a scenic picnic area. Participants may order lunch from the ADK Trading Post. Lunch menus will be provided before departure. Order and enjoy a warm Panini delivered picnic side via guide boat! There will be an optional 2 mile round trip hike up Low’s Ridge featuring spectacular views of the Bog River Valley and High Peaks. The round trip distance is 5 miles, or 7 miles if the hike up Low’s Ridge is added. Bring food (lunch can be ordered at departure), water, a jacket, appropriate attire/hiking shoes, binoculars, hat, sunscreen, and insect spray. Meet at the Geiger Arena parking area in Long Lake at 8 a.m. for transportation to the trailhead on Long Lake’s “Little Bus”! There is an outhouse at Hitchins Pond and a restroom at the Geiger Arena meeting location. Register by calling the Long Lake Parks and Recreation Department at 518-624-3077. This field trip is jointly sponsored by Northern New York Audubon and the Long Lake Parks and Recreation Department. There is a maximum of 15 participants.

Summer 2016 Hikes with Spencer Morrissey:

Spencer Morrissey

Spencer Morrissey

All trips meet and depart from the Mt. Sabattis Geiger Arena. Call 624-3077. You must pre-register in advance. These trips are free and guided by Spencer Morrissey. The Town of Long Lake provides transportation to provide minimize impact at trailhead.

July 26, 2016 – Mt. Adams, 8am Departure
5.2 miles round trip
8:00 am meet time at Geiger Arena
Moderate to Steep
Climb to one of the great Adirondack fire tower peaks and enjoy outstanding views deep into the High Peaks Region. Expect an easy hike to scenic Lake Jimmy and the old Observer’s cabin and then a more moderate to steep terrain along the summit trail to the top. Go into the fire tower for the views that will be an awe inspiring moment.

August 23rd, 2016 – Castle Rock Loop, 8am Departure
August 23rd
Castle Rock Loop – Blue Mountain Lake
4.25 miles Loop
8:00 am meet time at Geiger Arena
Easy to moderate
Hike this fascinating loop with stellar views out over Blue Mountain Lake and far into the Blue Ridge Wilderness Area. Gentle terrain will lead you to a slightly steeper final climb to a small cave passage and then the summit of Castle Rock. We will finish off the loop with a lovely walk along a different trail that passes by scenic Chub Pond

The Long Lake Little bus will provide transportation to hiking site. All hikers meet at Mt. Sabattis Geiger Arena across from the Long Lake Post office located on Pavilion Way and 1100 Deerland Road (off of South Hill Road) NYS Route 30.

You must sign up in advance. Due to group restriction size the max number for the trip is 15.

While this trip is free, we encourage gratuities and family donations to the Parks & Rec department to help off-set the cost of this expedition program.

All hikers must sign waiver forms which will be available the day of the hike.

Summer Gear List

Trekking Poles
Comfortable hiking boots or trail shoes
Extra pair of socks
Rain Jacket
Camera
Headlamp – just in case
Small backpack
2 liters of water, minimum
Lunch and snacks
Sunscreen
Bug repellant – might not need it

Sunglasses-optional
Hat-optional

Avoid cotton. It isn’t a huge deal in the summer, but if it gets wet it will stay wet and become heavy and uncomfortable.

To sign up for a trip call 518.624.3077.

Accessing the High Peaks from Long Lake Base Camp

By guest Blogger Spencer Morrissey

Owls Head Mountain, Helms’ Aero Service, the Hotel, Hoss’s Country Corner are all things that spark a memory in all of us when we think of Long Lake. But what many don’t realize is that Long Lake makes for a great Basecamp for the High Peaks Region, in fact a portion of the High Peaks Region falls within the town limits. I’m talking about Upper Works and the Tahawus Region. Within a pinch over a half hour you can be at three distinct trailheads that will access you to over a dozen of the 46 High Peaks, not mention many other locations like Duck Hole, Mount Adams, Flowed Lands, Lake Colden, Indian Pass, and Hanging Spear Falls.
Now to break it down a bit for you here are the three locations and the High Peaks you can enjoy from right out Long Lake’s backdoor.

Santanoni and Duck Hole Trailhead: This is located on the left just over 2-miles past the intersection at the Tahawus mine.

Santanoni, Panther, and Couchsachraga can all be climbed from this trailhead and usually as a long day trip. The loop consists of around 14 miles of road walking, trail hiking, and herd path navigation. The views are outstanding and the remoteness of the region is like few others.
Mount Adams and Allen Mountain Trailhead: This is located on the right just over 3-miles past the intersection at the Tahawus mine.

This trailhead is much more popular for Mount Adams that it is for Allen Mountain, but if you want to climb Allen, this is the ONLY trailhead to do so from efficiently. Allen is a very long, nearly 18-mile round trip that will encompass hiking on marked trails, road walking, and navigation of a herd path.
Upper Works Trailhead: This is located at the end of Upper Works Road which is just over 3.5-miles past the intersection at the Tahawus mine.

This trailhead is like a mecca for hikers and during busy weekends will be packed like sardines with cars lined up the road. From here you can access many of the High Peaks and have options for camping as needed for the long hikes.
• Mount Marshall – 14 to 15 mile RT over trails and a distinct herd path
• Algonquin and Iroquois from Lake Colden – 18 to 19 miles RT using trails and a herd path for Iroquois. This is not the most popular route to these peaks but if you want a challenge it will give you that.
• Mount Colden – 15 to 16 mile RT using all marked trail. This will gain you one of the most fantastic High Peaks on the list and this trail is a fun one, steep, but fun.
• Mount Cliff and Redfield – a 16+ mile RT day is what it will take for these two peaks by using marked trails and distinct herd paths to both of these summits. You will be challenged and you will love it. This trailhead is one of the more popular approaches to these two peaks.
• Gray Peak, Mount Skylight, and Mount Marcy – These three peaks while easily accessed from this side will require a 20+ miles RT day, and that’s to get just one. If you so desire all three, a day trip would be one for the record books, but done more often that one might think. Consider one night at Uphill Lean to break up the distance and then come back to Long Lake for some great food and drink to celebrate.
Shorter Hikes from the Tahawus/Upper Works Region are not lacking, so if you have the family or just want to get out for a stroll. Here are a few to consider:
• Mount Adams – 5.2 miles RT over moderate to steep terrain
• Flowed Lands – 9.4 miles RT over moderate terrain
• Summit Rock in Indian Pass – 7.4 miles RT over moderate to steep terrain
• Old MacIntyre Furnace Historical Site – Roadside attraction
• Lake Jimmy – 1-mile RT over easy terrain
• Tahawus Ghost Town – Roadside attraction
• Lake Colden – 11.4 miles RT over moderate terrain

Roosevelt Truck Trail Guided Hike Aug 25th

Roosevelt-Truck Trail is an excellent place to explore

Roosevelt-Truck Trail is an excellent place to explore

Roosevelt Truck Trail
Tuesday, August 25, 2015
Minerva, NY, Bus Departure at 7am

Lovely, mature boreal habitat spans the 2.5 mile long Roosevelt Truck Trail. This wide, road-sized trail runs between Route 28N and the Blue Ridge Road in Minerva. Joan Collins will lead a hike along this route beginning at the Blue Ridge Road trailhead and ending at the Route 28N trailhead. The trail has hilly and level terrain with an overall loss of 100 feet in elevation by the end of our hike. The habitat along the route provides a year-round home to many boreal bird species. Participants will also be looking for animal tracks – Black Bear and Moose tracks are frequently found on this old road. In August, the Roosevelt Truck Trail is a wonderful place to look for mushrooms and lichens. Meet at the Geiger Arena parking area in Long Lake at 7 a.m. for transportation to the trailhead on Long Lake’s “Little Bus”! There is a restroom at the Geiger Arena, and there are two outhouses along the trail at camping locations. Bring food, water, a jacket, appropriate attire/hiking shoes, binoculars, hat, sunscreen, and insect spray. Register by calling the Long Lake Parks and Recreation Department at 518-624-3077. This field trip is jointly sponsored by Northern New York Audubon and the Long Lake Parks and Recreation Department. There is a maximum of 15 participants.

Free Hiking Trips Offered with Certified Guides in Long Lake NY

The Town of Long Lake is coordinating six hikes, July through September, with NYS certified guides Joan Collins and Spencer Morrissey. These two experienced hikers will take you on hikes of varying lengths and levels of difficulty through some of the classic and lesser known Adirondack trails.

Spencer Morrissey is a 46er, a bushwack 46er, and Adirondack 100 finisher. He has climbed 675 different Adirondack peaks. Morrissey is proficient in GPS, map and compass navigation. In addition to year-round Adirondack excursions, Morrissey has also been a team leader of a Mt. Rainer expedition and for Mount Adams in Washington State, and he has completed New Hampshire’s 4000 footers, Death Valley expeditions as well as a vast resume of winter excursions. Morrissey is the author of “The Other 54” and “Adirondack Trail Runner.” He also writes for the Lake Placid Convention and Visitors Bureau and the Town of Long Lake’s website, www.mylonglake.com/blog.

Sargent Pond Trek on Tuesday, July 14th, 2015

Sargent Pond Trek on Tuesday, July 14th, 2015

Joan Collins is a New York State licensed bird guide, bird walk leader, writer, and speaker on ornithology topics. She has led walks and made presentations for many organizations including Audubon, the Adirondack Mountain Club, and the New York State Ornithological Association. Joan also belongs to the ranks of the intrepid Adirondack 46ers (having climbed all 46 peaks in the Adirondacks over 4,000 feet).

Dates and hikes are as follows:
July 14th – Sargent Pond Loop with Spencer Morrissey
July 20th – Birding Trip to Massawepie with Joan Collins
July 28th – Ledge Mountain with Spencer Morrissey
August 11th – Owls Head Mountain with Spencer Morrissey
August 25th – Roosevelt Truck Trail with Joan Collins
September 19th – Birding Trip to Lows Ridge with Joan Collins

These hikes are free to the public but have limited space for participants. For full listing and detailed description of hikes, please view the calendar of events at www.mylonglake.com. Call 518-624-3077 for waivers and to register.

Winter Hiking

The Town of Long Lake has two more winter snowshoe hikes available this season and both are free.

On Saturday, February 22nd, join Spencer Morrissey for a hike to Sawyer & Little Sawyer Mountain and on Saturday, March 1st, join Joan Collins, resident bird expert, on a trek along the Roosevelt Truck Trail.

Winter_Hiking

Guiding Fee: FREE!

Room for 15 on the trip. Winter trips are not recommended for kids under 12, without prior experience in similar outings Transportation provided by the Town of Long Lake, meet at the LL Town Offices, 1130 Deerland Road, Long Lake, NY 12847, Call 518-624-3077 to reserve spot.

Sawyer and Little Sawyer
This two peak hike is a very unique adventure located in the backcountry near Indian Lake. We will follow a well developed trail to the summit of Sawyer Mountain before starting a short bushwhack route to Little Sawyer Mountain. Both peaks have great views and unique in their own respect. This will be a loop trip back to the starting point. Breaking trail through an open forest without a trail will be part of the learning experience and part of the trip as a whole. .

Snowshoes are a must and in no instance should anyone be wearing cotton (jeans, Hoodie, t-shirts ect…). Boots need to be warm, regular hiking boots will not be enough and in no instance will low top shoes be allowed. Gaiters are highly recommended.

Roosevelt Truck Trail
Snowshoe the Roosevelt Truck Trail in Minerva on March 1, 2014. Meet 8am at the Long Lake Town offices, 1130 Deerland Road. Participants must be pre-registered. Waivers will be available day of hike. This hike is FREE!

Participants must provide their own water and lunch.

Lovely, mature boreal habitat spans the 2.5 mile long Roosevelt Truck Trail. This wide, road-sized trail runs between Route 28N and the Blue Ridge Road in Minerva. Joan Collins will lead a snowshoe hike along this route beginning at the Route 28N trailhead and ending at the Blue Ridge Road trailhead. The trail has hilly and level terrain with an overall gain of 100 feet in elevation by the end of our hike. The habitat along the route provides a year-round home to many boreal bird species. Participants will also be looking for animal tracks – Black Bear and Moose tracks are frequently found on this old road. Meet at the Long Lake Town Offices, 1130 Deerland Road, Long Lake at 8 a.m. for transportation to the trailhead. (There are two outhouses along the trail (at two handicap accessible camping areas available in summer)!)

Call 518.624.3077 to sign up. Must have 4 minimum to run the trip.

SUGGESTED GEAR LIST
Everyone MUST have snowshoes. If snow level is low, snowshoes will still need to be carried but Microspikes will also be needed for icy conditions.

Required equipment
Waterproof/breathable pants and jacket
2-liters of water or Gatorade – large mouth opening so they don’t freeze
Warm hat
2-pairs gloves or 1 pair gloves and 1 pair of mitts
Warm boots and socks, not cotton socks
Backpack per person
Lunch and snacks
mid weight or heavy weight underwear top and bottom
Snowshoes (rentals available, $20)
Headlamp
Chemical hand warmers and toe warmers
Fleece or Primaloft jacket

Recommended equipment

Microspikes or other traction (rental available for $10)
Camera
Face mask/balaclava
Gaiters (highly recommended)

Winter trips are not recommended for kids under 12, without prior experience in similar outings


Equipment Rentals also available at

Hoss’s Country Corner 518-624-2481
Adk Trading Post 518-624-2357

Cedarlands Conservation Easement

Cedarlands Conservation Easement is located in Long Lake, NY. The easement is open to the public from September until June. It is off limits to the public during the summer months while the Boy Scout Camp is open.

Cedarlands Conservation Easement

Map of Cedarlands Conservation Easement

From Long Lake Hamlet (downtown) drive north on NY 30 and turn right onto Kickerville Lane. Go down Kickerville for 2 miles and the road turns into dirt. There are very forbidding signs on the right hand side of the dirt road that say No trespassing, private property and no clear marking for the easement property. The public does have access to the Cedarlands Conservation Easement Parking lot which is .8 miles down the dirt road on the left. Walk down the road .3 miles to three gated roads, take the gate on the left which continues the journey to Mud Pond and continues on to McRorie Lake.

You can hike to Mud Pond Mountain, but on the Cedarlands signs it is marked as OA Mountain. These trails are marked with tape and blue and silver discs. The hike offers beautiful views of McRorie Lake and the high peaks, but it’s a steep trek to get to the top. Use caution and take your time. Trail best climbed in decent weather. It is a faint path on an overgrown woods road and look for OA Trailhead sign. Use caution and always tell someone where you are going when hiking as there is no registration book at this trail site and it’s not a typical trailhead sign.

The DEC hasn’t marked these trails 100% at this writing and there are plans underway to someday make a more accesible portage to Mud Pond from the parking lot.

The hike into the woods is a pleasant wide road with some downed trees. The road is also open to biking.

The map (attached) This map has been compiled from many sources, and verified wherever possible, by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

Please note:
The Department makes no warranty as to the accuracy of this map and holds no liability for use of this map for any purpose. This map is intended to provide a generalized overview of recreational opportunities. This is not a trail map or land use map. Please obtain – and know how to use – topographic maps, compass, and a GPS device (optional) for navigational purposes. This map may be distributed for free, but must include this disclaimer.

Buttermilk Falls

Overview:
The trail to Buttermilk Falls is only about 0.1 miles, but Buttermilk falls is so much more than a walk. This destination is a great all-round spot for the entire family no matter age, physical ability level or experience.
Above the falls there is a canoe launch that can be used for boating up the Raquette River to a nice lean-to on a grassy point. Right above the falls there are several rock outcropping, opening up picnic areas and places to relax by the sounds of rushing water.

Below the falls there is also picnic spots, as well as swimming areas directly below the falls or a bit further down the Raquette River. The rocky falls are not recommended for climbing or diving from and should be highly respected.
There are also picnic benches in the area as well as a hiking trail. The hiking trail is designated as a canoe carry and part of the Northern Forest Canoe Trail. You can hike this trail to the put-in below the falls. Past this put-in there is a herd path along the river to access nice swimming areas downstream as well as attractive views out over the water. Eventually the herd path will connect with another carry trail and eventually end at two lean-tos on the south end of Long Lake.

Distance Round Trip:
Less than 0.5 miles
Approximate Time:
Minutes to the base of the falls, 30-minutes to the twin lean-tos on Long Lake

Trailhead Location:
From the intersection of Route 28 and Route 30 in the Town of Long Lake follow Route 28/30 toward Blue Mountain Lake. Continue to North Point Road on the right (located on sharp corner). Follow North Point Road for around 2-miles to the parking on the right.

Winter Access:
This area can be easily accessed in winter but the falls are much less dramatic. However the ice formations on the rocks can be very interesting. Be aware that the area can be very dangerous and slippery during the colder months.

Information and photos provided by Spencer Morrissey of Inca-Pah-Cho Wilderness Guides – 607.267.3474

Long Lake