Posts Taged 2013

Great Adirondack Garage Sale 2013

The Great Adirondack Garage Sale is BACK for 2013. With over 70 miles of sales, treasure hunters will be busy looking for bargains. Make Long Lake your first stop along the way along routes 28 & 30. Maps of Indian Lake, Old Forge, Inlet and Long Lake are ALL available HERE!

Happy Treasure Hunting!

Lots to be found at the Great Adirondack Garage Sale. Stop in Long Lake

Long Lake Garage Sale Map

Indian Lake Garage and Yard Sale Map

Inlet Garage Sale Map

Old Forge Garage Sale Listings 1 of 2 Old Forge sheets

Old Forge Garage Sale Map 2 of 2 Old Forge Sheets

All About Bears in Long Lake, NY Adirondacks

All About Bears was a presentation given by Ben Tabor a wildlife biologist from the NYS DEC and KC Kelly a DEC Environmental Conservation Officer. This following information was from his talk at the Long Lake Community Connections evening held on May 9, 2013.

Bears are charismatic mega-fauna. Black bears as a rule are timid, shy and scared and not aggressive (FYI not the same for Black Bears in Canada). Black bears will mark their territory by biting trees, putting their scent on their territory and let other bears know.. “Hey bears, I’m in town, back away from my soft mass.” (code words for berries)

Bears are omnivores and tend to eat vegetarian, but they will eat meat. They are not big hunters, but don’t rule them out when it comes to finding prey, depends on the year and availability of food. Bears will eat berries, acorns, nuts, apples, succulent grasses, dandelions, skunk cabbage, jack in the pulpit, buds of hardwood trees and insects.

Generally bears are not social, but May and June are their breeding season and males and females can be seen together. Bears have delayed implantation so they will be fertilized in the spring, but will not implant the eggs until November. Bears breed every two years. Bears chemically decide how many cubs they have; it’s a combination of hormones, and body fat that makes that determination. All bears give birth on January 20th or 21st. Typical for Adirondack bears are broods of 2-3 cubs but Momma’s can produce from one to five bears and they can even have albinos (not to be mistaken for Polar Bears)

By August 1st the bears are weaned and ready to go off on their own. Sometimes a mom will let them den up with her for one more year, but come spring she sends them on their way. Bears are not adults until they are four years old. Most of the reports to the DEC involve younger bears that tend to get into trouble, whether they are climbing inside dumpsters or approaching someone’s home. If a bear doesn’t get into trouble with the DEC by age three they probably never will. Adult male bears are about 300 pounds and an adult Momma bear about 150 pounds.

Currently New York State boasts about 10,000 bears statewide. There is an effort to sustain the population, and the DEC monitors and develops hunting regulations and makes opportunities available to hunt bear based on the numbers, population and ability to sustain on natural food. The goal is to maintain the bear population for future generations, but to also ensure that the bears don’t become a nuisance to the general population. Bear hunting is a regulated harvest and it’s challenging to find a bear, much less haul it out of the woods, but benefits of bear include their meat which is a good source of protein, hide, fat (when rendered makes a heck of a pie) and the gall used for medicinal purposes. If you hunt bear, cook the meat to an internal temp of 137 degrees because they do carry trichinosis.

Safety tips
Don’t feed bears. A fed bear is a dead bear because once a bear finds a food source; they won’t back away until they’ve exhausted the food source. Bears will eat bird feeders; remove the feeders from April until November. Don’t be surprised if someone knocks on your door if they see bird feeders out and full during the off season.

What do you do if you see a bear? If you see a bear in a tree, don’t call to report it. Leave it alone, it got up the tree, it will come down, but you have to leave it alone. The bear is in the tree for safety.

The best thing to do be pre-emptive before anything escalates. Call Ray Brook DEC Wildlife 518 -897-1291 or 518-897-1326 to report bear disturbances. If you notice a bear peaking in your windows, or seems to be holding court on your property, eyeballing your activities that is not normal. Call the DEC. If you see a bear cross the road, let it be, but if there is a bear on or near your property that seems to be assessing and studying your property, call the DEC and report it.

The DEC keeps track of bears, their habitation, their habituation, and their environment. Whatever you do, don’t feed the bears. It’s against the law to feed bears. You will get ticketed and fined if you are caught feeding the bears. Don’t do it. You are putting your neighbors and the bear’s life at risk. Don’t make soup and leave it under your porch, don’t leave dog food or cat food outside. Use bear proof containers, or electric fences for large dumpsters.

Out west bear proof dumpsters are the norm and all over the place. In the East, the dumpster companies don’t provide bear proof dumpsters because there is no demand. Customers should be demanding Bear Proof Dumpsters because they are very effective, but consumers have to insist on the product for it to be made available on the east coast.

Already this year, 2013, it is extremely dry and the DEC has already had numerous reports of bear problems. Bears are attracted to residential garbage, dumpsters. Food hangs don’t work, don’t feed the dogs and cats outside, the bears will find their food.

No hand feeding or that bear will be in your house demanding food. He’ll break in, and he’ll wreck your house and he may even go to the bathroom in your home. The DEC will euthanize every single one of the hand fed bears. Don’t habituate bears because there is no rehabilitating bears once they are used to human contact.

Last summer the notorious Little Bear died among great controversy in Long Lake. Unfortunately a property owner who simply didn’t know that feeding would result in the bear’s death was feeding Little Bear. The bear feeding was happening because the bear was young, needy and hungry and the human felt bad for the bear. It was an honest mistake that can be corrected by education. The bear had become used to humans. After multiple sightings, the final straw occurred after the bear grabbed an ice cream cone out of a child’s hand at Stewarts. Bears are wild animals. They may be cute, and they may not hunt humans, but bears can and will swat at people if provoked and if they aren’t afraid because they’ve been used to human contact and human food.

Habituated bears will wander near roads and get hit by cars. Folks in the Adirondacks live in bear country so be respectful of the bears and be responsible. They couldn’t stress enough the importance of not leaving food out for the bears. A few years ago, in Old Forge, vehicles killed 19 bears. During hunting season only four bears were taken. Why did cars kill the bears? Because bears had found human food resources and they were living in and near the community and wandering around after dark and no one can see them at night because their fur absorbs all of the light.

How do you stop a bear from become too friendly or curious?
Remove the attraction, make noise, and use bear resistant cans when you hike or at home. The ways of the past has changed. Bears adapt and learn. Rubber buckshot at one time was commonly used to ward off and scare off bears. These days, rubber buckshot doesn’t work . The bears aren’t even scared of it. If they are hungry, they continue to eat their food. The DEC doesn’t move bears anymore because the bears will return and will travel great distances to get home. One bear that was moved out of a populated area was moved 80 miles from its home. It took several weeks, but due to tagging he was traced and returned back to his habitat after traveling 120 miles in the woods.

If you see a bear and it’s a menace call 897-1291 or 897-1326 and report it. Ben or KC will come out and address your bear issues. KC Kelly is the only DEC Encon officer in Northern Hamilton County so he has a lot of ground to cover, but he will respond. He also asked; if you have a neighbor, or see someone attracting bears to your neighborhood, anything unnatural, to call and report it. He just needs the address, not the name, so it takes a community to keep the bears safe.

Humans and bears should ignore each other. Long live the bears.

Snowmobile Season Winds Down

After unexpected early spring snowfall Long Lake and Raquette Lake enjoyed some unanticipated, but awesome extra weekends of snowmobiling. The Town of Long Lake wants to say a huge thank you to our visiting snowmobilers. Thank you for riding the trails, giving us feedback and visiting us this winter. We are very appreciative to have all of the riders and families discover our trails and our little towns. Do us a favor, next year, book in Long Lake and Raquette Lake and launch your expedition from here! We’re thrilled to have you, we appreciate your business and we’ll see you soon!

Thanks to Wayne in Raquette, Seth & Chad in Long Lake. Also a big shout out to the Long Lake Highway Crew for helping cut back the banks on North Point and Sabattis and Kickerville Roads this season. Also a shout out to Hamilton County Highway for keeping the roads open, leaving rideable banks and being so helpful and keeping the lines of communication open.

This is the last week of riding, the gates are still open. Some grooming will be continuing. Expecting some warmer temperatures this week.

Again.. THANK YOU to EVERYONE for riding our 70 miles of trails connecting Long Lake and Raquette Lake to our surrounding communities. Ride Safe and come back again!

Lifeguards Needed

The Town of Long Lake is now accepting applications for two open lifeguard positions. Applicant must be 16 or older. A copy of current Red Cross certification for Beach Waterfront, CPR and First Aid is required or proof that you are currently or will be taking the course. Applications are due March 29th at the Town of Long Lake Parks and Recreation Department.

Click here for a Town of Long Lake Employment Application.

Submit applications and copies of certifications to:

Long Lake Parks & Recreation
Attn: Lifeguard
PO Box 496
Long Lake, NY 12847

Adirondacks, The Brand

What I find funny.

Is the Adirondacks really a brand? When a salesguy in charge of Tourism Marketing calls me from Michigan and wants Long Lake to advertise in its USA Today National Travel Parks Magazine and I explain the size of my town and the size of my budget he’s still insistent on selling me an ad for my city. So I stop him an say “David, I’m not a city”

Then I break down that I’m in the Adirondacks and he really needs to be focusing on bigger money, and that my teeny budget can only be stretched so far, he interrupts and says : “AdderDax?” “What’s that, how do you spell that?”

Adderdacks?

Umm… So I respond by saying, well The Adirondacks is 6.1 million acres of public and private land in Upstate New York that equals the size of Yellowstone, Yosemite, Grand Canyon, Glacier,and Great Smoky Mountains combined. Silence on the other end. Pause pause pause, clicking, I think he’s googling. He thinks I’m making it up, I can tell by the sound of his voice. “Bigger than the Grand Canyon?”

“Yes, David”

So I get a little frustrated when I’m in meetings and the conversation leads to “re-branding” the Adirondacks. I have a suggestion, why don’t we actually brand the Adirondacks? Why don’t we actually spend money and educate people that the Adirondacks even exist? Who’s in charge of writing those social studies textbooks in Texas? Anyone have a name?

I lived in Cranford, NJ and Manhattan for over 20 years and let me tell you, most of my neighbors and co-workers had never ever heard of the Adirondacks and it was less than five hours away. “There’s nothing north of Westchester County” “Upstate New York? You mean Buffalo?” “We didn’t even know this place was there, we love Vermont.” “You guys have lakes, rivers and mountains and bears, birds, fish and bobcats and loons and owls?” Ummmm.. yeah and we also have places to sleep including hotels, motels, campgrounds and lean-tos and lots of our access to this great wild land is free.

So I’m amused. I’ll admit it. I’m amused. The governor is shaking trees, scrambling his warriors and his people together to get everyone to find a plan to get tourists to the Adirondacks. Nevermind that he wants all this tourism money to come into the Adirondacks yet the state is cutting funding for our rural schools, so once he gets all these tourists here there won’t be any businesses open because all the young folks working them had to leave so their children could get an education. But I digress…

So I don’t really know who’s in charge of the Adirondacks. Is there one bureau for this? The Adirondack Bureau of Adderdacks Advertising? We have seven regions, let’s see, the coast, the wild, the lakes, the seaway, Tug Hill, Lake George and Lake Placid. Is that everything? How are people supposed to figure out what the heck they want to do?

I know I’ve sat on committees to revitalize, committees to get grant money, committees to talk about committees, and usually when sitting on these committees, they never include the entire area of the Adirondacks. The Adirondacks is sliced, diced and broken up when it comes to money, advertising and funding, but lumped together as one when it’s failing.

I think we’re having an identity crisis… or just a crisis.

So as I steer my salesman to bigger fish, yes if you work in one of those seven regions Dave might be calling you, but he’s doing his own research because I didn’t even know who to tell him to call. While everyone struggles to figure out where to put the most effective ads, how to reach the most people, just remember we do have a lot of people living within a days drive of this magnificent place I’m lucky enough to call home, but there’s plenty of people out there that have never even heard of us.

So let me know when the Adirondacks gets branded. I can’t wait.

Winter Wacky Week in Long Lake Kicks Off!

The excitement for Winter Wacky Week has begun. On Tuesday, February 19th over 15 children participated in a roster of events including Manhunt, Capture the Flag, Snow Shelter Building, skating and sledding for “Kids Survivor” At the end of the day kids enjoyed pizza provided by the Long Lake Diner.

Kids Kick off Winter Wacky Week with a Quick Pose before Sledding

Directions for Manhunt are announced.

The littlest visitors enjoyed a skate on the ice. Great Conditions!

Snow Shelter has been created

On Wednesday, February 20th everyone is invited to come to the Mt. Sabattis Geiger Arena to help craft the Long Lake Giant Snowman at Noon if the structural engineers deem it safe to take off the form sides. If not, the snowman will be completed on Thursday, February 21st.

Kids will work together along with Events Coordinator Danielle Gagnier to create the Giant Snowman. Initial plans included trying to usurp the worlds record which was made by the folks of Bethel, Maine, and named after Maine senator Olympia Snowe. The the snow woman was 122 feet, one inch high and broke the Guinness world record for the largest snowman.

Long Lake’s snowman stands in it’s boxed forms at 16 feet high. It is located across from the Long Lake Post Office at the Mt. Sabattis Geiger Arena Parking Lot. The design was created and engineered by Erik Arsenault, Danielle Gagnier and the Long Lake Highway Department, Pat Gibbs and Craig Wamback.

The Long Lake Highway Department kills two birds with one stone. Cleaning up snow and using it to fill forms for Snowmen.

Filling the Giant Snowforms with snow

Raquette Lake Winter Carnival to be held Saturday, February 16th.

Unlike any Winter Carnival you’ve ever attended, Raquette Lake boasts a sense of community and true Adirondack pride with this Winter themed traditional event.

Youth participate in Winter games such as snowshoe relay, goalies day off puck shot contest, snow dodgeball and a Winter Carnival first; an afternoon envelope making craft class held at the Raquette Lake Union Free School. Adults can have their turn at envelope making with a separate evening class. Stan Kolonko from The Ice Farm will be joining us back in Raquette Lake to construct an ice fire tower to be lit immediately following the Fireworks.

There’s plenty to do for kids and adults alike. Adults let loose and participate in the ice golf tournament, a Winter Carnival favorite! Ladies can take out some aggression with the annual famed Ladies Frying Pan toss. Ladies gather from miles around to send our custom griddle flying! But be sure to sign up fast, because only the first 50 ladies get a chance at the coveted title of Frying Pan Toss champion.

When the street lights come on we are bringing back an old Raquette Lake Winter Carnival tradition, tug of war battle in the street beside the Raquette Lake Library! Worried about the chill? Worry no more, we’ll have the bonfire blazing all day long and the Raquette Lake Library and Raquette Lake Tap Room are always warm and welcoming! For more information please contact Raquette Lake Parks and Recreation at 518-624-3077

Long Lake