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Memorial Day Weekend 2020

Memorial Day Weekend has arrived. Long Lake is excited to welcome back our second home owner residents, guests, visitors, fishermen, sunbathers, recreational enthusiasts and birds, bears, and all walks of wildlife. We have been busy gearing up for your arrival to keep everyone healthy and safe as possible, but we need your help too.

We invite and ask everyone to please wear a mask in public, especially when less than 6 feet apart from anyone outside your immediate family and at our area businesses, inside or out.

We are observing CDC recommended social distancing protocols which recommend everyone to keep 6 feet apart as much as possible. Please observe the safety measures and wear a cloth face-covering when picking up food or retails items or in our essential stores and don’t forget to wash your hands frequently.

Stay safe, please help keep our small community healthy. We are excited to have our curbside-only retail operations, essential businesses and our take-out restaurants open and we ask you adhere to their safety standards so they can take good care of you too.

Please note: The Memorial Day Parade is suspended for 2020, but the American Legion Post #650 will be hosting a small-private ceremony commemorating those who have lost their lives while serving this country. The Long Lake Cemetery will be open to the public on Monday by 12 p.m.

The population of Hamilton County has grown significantly over the past several weeks and as things continue to re-open in our region, the population will increase in response.  It is critical that all of our residents continue to wear masks when in public, respect social distancing, and do not host social gatherings. Do not plan family reunions, birthday parties or other festivities. Remember that the healthcare infrastructure in Hamilton County is limited, we do not have a hospital or urgent care facility, and an outbreak in Hamilton County will have a significant impact on our summer and ability to re-open fully.

Model the behavior that you wish to see! Whether you are on a hiking trail, enjoying the local beach or picking up a curbside meal from one of your favorite restaurants, be mindful and respectful of those around you. There will be changes to the way we all interact this summer, but we hope to maintain the same sense of relaxation and hospitality. Our future relies on each of you to do your part!


#NorthCountryStrong

NYS Executive Order 202.17

 

Schedule Announcement
Please note: The Memorial Day Parade is suspended for 2020, but the American Legion Post #650 will be hosting a small-private ceremony commemorating those who have lost their lives while serving this country. The Long Lake Cemetery will be open to the public on Monday by 12 p.m.

Hamilton County Masks Recommendation Covid-19 Update

Public Health Director Update: The CDC and Hamilton County Public Health Recommend Wearing A Protective Cloth Face Covering When in Public. Posted 4.5.2020

Social distancing has been an excellent public health intervention for slowing the spread of COVID-19 to residents in Hamilton County. However, there are times where it is necessary to travel outside of your home, such as going to the pharmacy, grocery store or post office. On these occasions, the CDC and Hamilton County Public Health are recommending that you wear a cloth face covering to protect yourself and others.

Over the last month we have had a chance to observe areas with high concentration of COVID-19 respond to the virus being present in their community. We know that COVID-19 is present in Hamilton County, we have expected this all along, and now our job is to prevent it from multiplying, keeping our numbers and rate of transmission low. Wearing a cloth face covering when in public is another prevention strategy that we can easily implement to maintain the health and safety of our community.

New Guidance From CDC
“CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores and pharmacies), especially in areas of significant community-based transmission. CDC also advises the use of simple cloth face coverings to slow the spread of the virus and help people who may have the virus and do not know it from transmitting it to others.”

An individual with COVID-19 may only display mild symptoms, and can be asymptomatic for 1-14 days. Wearing a cloth mask does not necessarily protect you from contracting the virus, but rather acts as a protective barrier from you infecting others. Vulnerable individuals, such as those with complex medical comorbidities, immunocompromised are strongly encouraged to continue to self-isolate and stay home during this pandemic.

Medical grade protective equipment, such as surgical masks and N95’s, should not be worn by the public. These supplies should be reserved for healthcare workers and first responders, as they are already in short supply, and are at high risk for exposure to COVID-19.
Cloth face coverings should:
• Fit snugly but comfortably against the side of the face
• Cover the mouth and nose
• Be secured with ties or ear loops
• Include multiple layers of fabric
• Allow for breathing without restriction
• Be able to be laundered and machine dried without damage or change to shape

“Cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the cloth face covering without assistance.”

If the face cloth becomes moist or soiled, it is more likely to hold bacteria and viruses, so it is important to keep it clean and dry. Be careful when removing the cloth face covering to avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth, and wash your hands after.

Remember, with COVID-19 and individual can be infectious for 4 to 5 days, without showing symptoms. In addition to social distancing and handwashing, this is one additional strategy where Hamilton County residents can work together to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 in our communities.

Erica Mahoney
Director of Public Health

Know the difference between masks

Long Lake