Posts Taged fall

Long Lake Raquette Lake Foliage Report 9/30/2020

Reports from the area report near complete change and to just past peak conditions with bright shades of red mixed in with oranges and yellows. Wind and rain have brought many leaves down, but it’s not over yet. 

We had some incredible color over the weekend. When we say it’s “transitioning fast” we had no idea how fast, but fast and glorious it was.  But don’t fret, there is still time to catch some amazing, dramatic light, color and views this upcoming week.  

The recent weather has ranged from humid, warm, balmy, to a night or two of frost which elevated the leaves into speedy and vibrant color change.  With these colder overnight temps, warm days and a drought we got some outstanding colors this past weekend with more to come.  

Yes we’ve had some rain and wind, so we do have foliage already falling at a rapid clip, but there are more leaves to be seen!

With that said, … it’s not over!  There are still trees yet to turn. We have bold yellows and oranges still to emerge and some stubborn maples just changing over now, having held on to their green for oh that much longer.  

There is still time to catch the beauty of it all this upcoming weekend.  With colder temps, and sunshine predicted, layer up in your best woodsy fashion gear and start exploring! 

Weekend Weather Outlookr:

Friday 10/02
50% / 0.11 in
Cloudy with occasional rain showers. High near 55F. Winds SW at 5 to 10 mph. Chance of rain 50%.

Saturday 10/03
20% / 0 in
Considerable cloudiness. High 52F. Winds W at 5 to 10 mph

Sunday 10/04
20% / 0 in
Partly cloudy skies in the morning will give way to cloudy skies during the afternoon. High 54F. Winds S at 5 to 10 mph.

 

Things to Do While Staying in Long Lake

1. Visit Buttermilk Falls just outside of Long Lake on North Point Road. 
2. Saturday, October 3rd, Octo-BEAR-Fest at Hoss’s Country Corner, Cancer Fundraiser. Vendors, Food sold, live music.
3. Custards Last Stand Ice Cream
4. Friday Lobster Roll at the ADK Trading Post
5. Drink and Dinner specials from the Long View, Adirondack Hotel, Long Lake Diner and The Cellar Restaurant and Pub
6. Visit the Wild Center in Tupper Lake
7. Visit Hoss’s Country Corner and see the tree growing in the store.
8. Group photos at the Long Lake Town Beach
9. Drive down Sabattis Road and North Point Road for back roads.
10. Go HIKING!  Coney Mountain, Sargents Ponds, Castle Rock, Ferds Bog, Death Brook Falls, Sagamore Lake, Mt. Sabattis click here for more hiking info
11. Visit Raquette Lake Village and take a step back in time. 

 

Please note:  All local busineses require masks inside and all social distancing protocols and safety plans are enacted at all area lodgings, dining, and retail establishments. Plenty of activities to do outside, just layer up and if you forget something, pop into Hoss’s or Northern Borne for some additional gear. 

 

Fall Foliage Update 9/24/20

In Long Lake and Raquette Lake, look for 50% change in the foliage this upcoming weekend. Leaves are transitioning quickly, with average to bright shades of orange and red rapidly appearing across the landscape. Red and gold leaves are of above-average brilliance and average shades of yellow and gold.

Check out the backroads in and around the area including Uncas Road/Brown’s Tract in Raquette Lake, Sagamore Road in Raquette Lake, North Point Road, Sabattis Road in Long Lake are great options for a quiet drive and scenic stops along the way.

Fun family hikes for leaf peeping include Lows Ridge off of Horseshoe Lake Road, Coney Mountain, Owls Head Mountain in Long Lake, Mt. Sabattis in downtown Long Lake, Goodnow in Newcomb or Check out the Cascades/Powerhouse or Lake trail at Great Camp Sagamore in Raquette Lake. 

Weekend Weather

Friday 09/25
20% / 0 in
Sunshine and clouds mixed. High 72F. Winds SW at 5 to 10 mph.

Saturday 09/26
10% / 0 in
Except for a few afternoon clouds, mainly sunny. High around 75F. Winds S at 5 to 10 mph.

Sunday 09/27
10% / 0 in
Cloudy skies early, then partly cloudy in the afternoon. High 77F. Winds SSW at 10 to 15 mph.

First Time Hunter Bags a Buck

This post was first published on mylonglake.com on October 20, 2015. Written by Long Lake Events Coordinator, Steph Hample

The snow had finally started to stick on the ground in the northern Adirondacks the day I shot my very first deer. My father-in-law told me to walk approximately a quarter of a mile down the trail to where it starts to slope downhill and to tuck myself off the trail. He would try to drive deer to me from the marsh. I have a terrible sense of distance so at what seemed to be a quarter of a mile and the slightest downhill I started to step off the trail. There was a good sized rock just off the trail that I tried to get to approach, but as I stepped off the trail the fresh snow barely muffled the loud, echoing crunch of the leaves beneath it. My foot sank up to my knees making the loudest crackling snaps from the frozen leaves. As I was thinking how loud I was being, I caught a glimpse of movement out of the corner of my eye. I looked up to see two deer, one with antlers, one without.

Steph Hample with her first buck.

Steph Hample with her first buck.

They froze, I froze.

Three thoughts sped through my mind, Whoa. Antlers. I can shoot. Then a pause, “was I really going to do this?”

I took the Hunters Safety course when I was twelve years old. I went into the woods a couple of times with my dad, but it took me twenty-one more years before I finally felt ready to harvest a deer. Was I actually going to kill this beautiful animal standing before me? Yes, I was. Everything my dad had taught me ran through my head; wait until they’re broadside; aim for the rear of the shoulder, middle of the chest; just squeeze the trigger; listen for the deer after you shoot; you won’t notice your ears ringing. In what felt like forever, but probably less than 30 seconds after stepping off the trail into the noisy brush I raised my dad’s gun to my shoulder and took aim. Attempting to slow my breathing was nearly impossible and expletives ran through my head as I put my finger on the trigger and squeezed. The first thing I noticed after I pulled the trigger was my ringing ears.

My dad said one of two things would happen once you’ve shot a deer; 1 – you’ll shoot and the deer will run and fall somewhere else or 2 – you’ll shoot and the deer will just run away. He didn’t mention a third option; you’ll shoot and the deer will just drop.

The deer fell to the ground. Out of the corner of my eye, I saw the female run off. The buck was trying to get back up and it was one of the hardest things to watch. I attempted to take a second shot but I was shaking so hard that I completely missed. I’m not too proud to admit that watching him on the ground trying to get back up made me tear up. I walked over to him and laid my hand on his back and waited for him to stop moving. I’ve already been lectured and now realize in hindsight it was not the smartest move to stand next to a dying animal that has antlers and hooves, but I knew I had to be there when he finally died. I knew he was gone when the hair on his legs slowly relaxed.

I stood up, shocked, solemn and proud at what I had just done. After I cleared my head I counted the antlers; eight! My first deer was a beautiful eight point buck. My dad and father-in-law were going to be so proud! I couldn’t wait for my father-in-law to get there. I stood around waiting for him to show up thinking he must have heard the shots, he should be right here. At about the same moment I heard a branch snap. I called out my father-in-law’s name, turning toward the noise expecting to see him only to see another buck staring back at me. I couldn’t believe it. I had just shot a nice eight-point buck and here was a second one literally walking over to me. We eyed each other for a few seconds before he eventually ran off, but I was floored by my experience.

When my father-in-law finally found me he used a few choice works, smiled, handed me his phone and said, “Call your Dad.” We quickly field dressed the deer so my father-in-law could follow the trail of the second deer, but he searched without luck.

The snow on the ground made the drag easier, which was helpful since the deer weighed more than I did. Back in town my buck weighed in at 167lbs. I think everyone was surprised that this big buck was shot by a “girl”. I eventually took it back to my parents’ house where my dad helped me skin it, my mom helped me butcher it and my kids helped me eat it. Now the deer hangs on my wall, beautifully mounted for all to see (and for me to brag about).

The prize proudly displayed

The prize proudly displayed

I’m excited to head out into the woods again this year. I know that I will probably never have a story that quite compares to this one but I’m just happy to be able to get back out there and hopefully enjoy another one of Mother Nature’s free-range, hormone-free, organic bucks.

written by: Steph Hample

Steph Hample was a biologist at the Wild Center for eight years. She is currently the Events Coordinator for the Town of Long Lake planning activities year-round for the communities of Long Lake and Raquette Lake. When she’s not busy researching trivia questions she’s out conquering ambitious hikes around the Adirondacks and spending time with her two children and loving pets.

Leaf Peeping Peak All Week

The leaves on the trees in Long Lake and the Central Adirondacks are at peak and with the five day weather forecast, this is the time to be moving throughout the park. Favorite places to spot leaves? Travel down Sabattis Road, North Point Road to Buttermilk Falls, fly with Helms Aero Service or stop in at the Long Lake Boat Tour and check out his schedule. The tour operator checks daily at tour times to see if anyone is there looking for a foliage tour. Another classic excursion is in Raquette Lake aboard the W.W. Durant. If you need more info call the tourism office in Long Lake at 518-624-3077. We want to welcome all our visitors, especially our global visitors who have been moving about. It’s wonderful to meet you!

Long Lake