Posts Taged hiking

Lows Ridge as seen in the Fall

Leaf Peeping Guided Hike 2019


Low’s Ridge – Upper Dam Trail
Leaf Peeping and Birding!
Saturday, October 5, 2019
Bus Departure at 7am, Long Lake Geiger Arena, Mt. Sabattis, 6 Pavilion Way

Join Joan Collins for a walk into beautiful Hitchins Pond and the Upper Dam on the Bog River. Common Loons nest on Hitchins Pond each year. Bald Eagles and Great Blue Herons are also a common sight. The route is an old dirt road that passes through many lovely and varied habitat areas including a boreal bog, marsh, mixed forest, and ponds/lakes. After the 2.5 mile walk on level terrain to Hitchins Pond, there will be a food break at a scenic picnic area. Participants may order lunch from the ADK Trading Post. Lunch menus will be provided before departure.

Order and enjoy a warm Panini delivered picnic side via guide boat! There will be an optional 2 mile round trip hike up Low’s Ridge featuring spectacular views of the Bog River Valley and High Peaks. The round trip distance is 5 miles, or 7 miles if the hike up Low’s Ridge is added. Bring food (lunch can be ordered at departure), water, a jacket, appropriate attire/hiking shoes, binoculars, hat, sunscreen, and insect spray. Meet at the Geiger Arena parking area in Long Lake at 7 a.m. for transportation to the trailhead on Long Lake’s “Little Bus”! There is an outhouse at Hitchins Pond and a restroom at the Geiger Arena meeting location.

 

Register by calling the Long Lake Parks and Recreation Department at 518-624-3077. This field trip is jointly sponsored by Northern New York Audubon and the Long Lake Parks and Recreation Department. There is a maximum of 15 participants.

Waterfalls, Family Fun & Spring Hikes in One Day

You have to see this to believe it!  A great journey made by Kayle and her family including a dog and a toddler. Hiking 7 miles through the Adirondacks this past weekend.  They visited Death Brook Falls, located in Raquette Lake, NY (almost across from Golden Beach Campground), Buttermilk Falls in Long Lake, Bog River Falls just south of Tupper Lake. 

They then finished up with a hike up Coney Mountain AND Goodman Mountain

Special Thanks to @kayycurrr for sharing her epic Instagram adventure with us and inspiring folks to explore all our Raquette Lake and Long Lake and Central Adirondack region has to offer!  

#goodmanmountain #coneymountain #deathbrookfalls #bogriverfalls #longlake #raquettelake #longlakeny #hikingwithtoddlers #hikingwithdogs

 

Got Snow? Need Shoes? Try out these Snowshoe Treks

If you are interested in taking the plunge into winter hiking, or want to share your passion for winter recreation with your kids or friends who are just beginning, Long Lake is the perfect hub.  With a variety of trails and mountains within a 20 minute drive, from toddler up to grandparents, and novice to expert, there is something for everyone and all experience levels.


Long Lake also offers multiple year-round lodging and dining options, stores to stock up on hats, gloves, and gear, or last minute things you may have forgotten.
 
These trails are listed from easier to harder, although all of them shouldn’t be a problem for the average person to complete.
 
Catlin Bay, Long Lake NY   (Easy/Beginner)
2.2 mile round trip from parking lot, located off Tarbell Hill Rd.
 
This is a great hike for the novice snowshoer looking to get some experience winter hiking. The trail is an easy 1.1 mile rolling trail to Catlin Bay on Long Lake, with some outstanding views of the lake, along with plenty of spots for a picnic, including some DEC maintained camp sites and a lean-to. The trail follows the Northville-Lake Placid trail both out and back, and should be fairly well traveled, and is well marked.  On a scale of 1-5 (1 being easiest) this hike should be about a 1 or 2.
 
Newcomb Visitors Interpretive Center (VIC)   (Easy)
5922 State Route 28N, Newcomb, NY 12852
518-582-2000
 
Many Trails around the Campus
 
The Newcomb VIC is another excellent area for people just getting into the winter hiking and snowshoe world, especially those looking for an educational aspect to their adventure.  The VIC has a number of well-maintained, flat to moderately inclined, trails running all over their campus, with signs at various points detailing information about specific flora and fauna to keep your eye out for. If you go on the weekend, there will be a staff naturalist on site that you can speak with and learn more about the property and wildlife in the area.  The VIC trail system also connects with the road into Great Camp Santanoni, for the ambitious hikers who want to log some miles that day.  This trail system ranges from a 1 to 2 in difficulty.
 
Sawyer Mountain, Between Blue Mountain Lake and Indian Lake  (Intermediate)
6.8 miles from gas station in Blue Mountain Lake, Trail head is on the right
 
2.1 mile round trip
 
While this hike does not boast some of the summit views that other area hikes might offer, it has multiple look-out points along the trail, and just after the summit, that more than make up for it.  From parking lot to summit is just over one mile, and mostly meanders through the woods, with some very minimal scrambling towards the summit, but nothing a child couldn’t easily get over.  The summit is mostly wooded in, but the scenery from the two look out points below the summit, and the one after the summit offer stunning views of the surrounding area.
This trail is fairly well trafficked, but shouldn’t be too busy most of the time, and is the perfect trail to bring your family pet along for the adventure.  This trail is rated around a 2-3 in difficulty, and should be handled by just about anyone.
 
Castle Rock, Blue Mountain Lake NY   (Intermediate)
1.6 miles down Maple Lodge Rd. in Blue Mountain Lake
 
2.8 mile round trip
 
Bang for your buck, Castle Rock provides some of the best views in the area without requiring a full day, or a particularly arduous hike. The 2.8 mile round trip is relatively easy, and offers an easier path to the summit called “The Loop Trail” which is very well marked at the trailhead. Added bonus to the hike are the “Talon” caves just before the summit. This hike is rated around a 2-3, depending on if you use the Loop Trail to summit.
 
Owl’s Head Mountain, Long Lake NY   (Intermediate)
1.6 miles from Route 30 on Endion Rd.
 
6.3 mile round trip
 
Don’t be intimated by the mileage on this hike, the first 2/3 of the trail are easy to moderate without too great of an incline or decline, the last 1/3 becomes mostly moderate, with a small scramble just before the summit. The summit itself offers beautiful 180 degree views, or climb the fire tower to take in the full 360 degree view, just make sure to take your snowshoes off before ascending the stairs.  Owl’s Head is a great trail to bring kids on their first “longer” hike due to the mellowness of most of the trail, and the payoff at the summit is more than worth the half day it might require. This hike is rated a 3-4, mostly due to the length, and the brief scramble just below the summit.
 
Some brief notes about winter hiking and things to consider/take with you on your next adventure:
 
Bring extra water (preferably in a container it can’t freeze in) because your hydration system drinking tube will freeze very quickly.
 
Pack multiple extra layers, including base layers, socks, hats, and at least one down jacket.
 
Remember that the days are very short in the winter, so plan your start time accordingly, and always take a headlamp and extra batteries with you.
 
Keeping your feet and hands warm and dry is of the utmost importance. Bring different options of gloves to make sure your hands stay toasty, but not too sweaty.
 
If you are attempting a longer hike, pack some things that can warm someone up rapidly, such as hand warmers, down jackets and pants, and a thermos of hot liquid such as miso soup or chicken broth.
 
The last thing to remember when jumping into winter hiking, do not pack what just what you think you will personally need, but pack what you think it will take to keep one of your hiking partners warm for 6-8 hours if they become incapacitated.  Stay warm, stay safe, sign the registration box, don’t litter, and take lots of pictures.

Written by Tim Helms, Long Lake Events Coordinator 2019
 

MUST SEES

First time visitors – short walks that are easy, and kid and dog friendly

Lake Eaton Campground – EASY

Buttermilk Falls – EASY – From town, travel south on NYS Route 30/28N towards Blue Mt. Lake for 2.9 miles, make a right at County Route 3/North Point Road/Buttermilk Falls Road.  Drive 2.1 miles and parking area will be on the right.

Coney Mountain – Easy/Intermediate
Winter Climbing: This trail is typically broken out by midday after a storm but can become quite slippery as you approach the summit. This is a great snowshoe, not recommended for skiing.

Spring Pond Bog Hike on July 12th

Spring Pond Bog

Boreal Birding

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Join Joan Collins for a hike to scenic Spring Pond Bog.  One of the most popular birding destinations in the Adirondacks and a designated “Important Bird Area” (IBA), Spring Pond Bog is the second largest bog in the New York State.  This Adirondack Nature Conservancy property contains diverse habitats and bird species.  Wetlands, bogs, boreal forest, mixed and deciduous forests, and areas growing back from logging activity, can all be found at this Tupper Lake property.  Spring Pond Bog is a primary study site for Spruce Grouse researchers in the Adirondacks.  Eighteen warbler species breed in this area including Northern Waterthrush, Mourning, Palm, and Canada Warblers.  Other boreal species include Common Loon, Northern Goshawk, Black-backed Woodpecker, Olive-sided, Yellow-bellied, and Alder Flycatchers, Philadelphia Vireo, Gray Jay, Boreal Chickadee, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Lincoln’s Sparrow, and the increasingly rare Spruce Grouse. 

The hiking trail to Spring Pond Bog gradually climbs through a hardwood forest to a glacial esker.  There is a boardwalk loop to the right of the esker that takes visitors into the bog for close-up views of plant and bird life.  The trail is less than a mile long.  We will make a couple other stops and hike along level dirt roads in boreal forest within the Spring Pond Bog complex.  Bring food (lunch), water, appropriate attire/hiking shoes, binoculars, hat, sunscreen, and insect spray.  Meet at the Geiger Arena parking area in Long Lake at 7 a.m. for transportation to the trailhead on Long Lake’s “Little Bus”!  There is a restroom at the Geiger Arena.  Register by calling the Long Lake Parks and Recreation Department at 518-624-3077.  This field trip is jointly sponsored by Northern New York Audubon and the Long Lake Parks and Recreation Department.  There is a maximum of 15 participants.

 

Roosevelt Truck Trail Guided Hike Aug 25th

Roosevelt-Truck Trail is an excellent place to explore

Roosevelt-Truck Trail is an excellent place to explore

Roosevelt Truck Trail
Tuesday, August 25, 2015
Minerva, NY, Bus Departure at 7am

Lovely, mature boreal habitat spans the 2.5 mile long Roosevelt Truck Trail. This wide, road-sized trail runs between Route 28N and the Blue Ridge Road in Minerva. Joan Collins will lead a hike along this route beginning at the Blue Ridge Road trailhead and ending at the Route 28N trailhead. The trail has hilly and level terrain with an overall loss of 100 feet in elevation by the end of our hike. The habitat along the route provides a year-round home to many boreal bird species. Participants will also be looking for animal tracks – Black Bear and Moose tracks are frequently found on this old road. In August, the Roosevelt Truck Trail is a wonderful place to look for mushrooms and lichens. Meet at the Geiger Arena parking area in Long Lake at 7 a.m. for transportation to the trailhead on Long Lake’s “Little Bus”! There is a restroom at the Geiger Arena, and there are two outhouses along the trail at camping locations. Bring food, water, a jacket, appropriate attire/hiking shoes, binoculars, hat, sunscreen, and insect spray. Register by calling the Long Lake Parks and Recreation Department at 518-624-3077. This field trip is jointly sponsored by Northern New York Audubon and the Long Lake Parks and Recreation Department. There is a maximum of 15 participants.

John Collins Former LLCS Teacher Honored

On, November 14, 2009 John Collins was awarded the honorable achievement, the Howard Zahniser Award by the organization, Protect the Adirondacks. He received this award for his efforts, courage, education and passion to protect the Adirondack Park & Catskill Park. I was asked to write something about his time teaching at Long Lake Central School and I thank all of you who generously shared some very funny memories and the following is a compilation of insights many friends shared, so I thank you. FYI Howard Zahniser was the author of the federal Wilderness Act of 1964. I was honored to be asked to write something for the program because Mr. C was a very important influence on my own personal history and on so many others who contributed to this compilation.

The following appeared in the program…
He made an indelible impression on the students passing through his classroom. He expected participation, and was often met with resistance, but he never gave up. He went out of his way to encourage those who didn’t embrace traditional modes of learning for hard labor, hammering nails, reading, physical exertion, or memorizing poetry.

He wore the part well, with a macramé belt, short sleeve print shirt and a cotton tie with a flat end, and he was often heard muttering, “don’t touch my tie.” He made us memorize “El Dorado,” “The Road Not Taken,” and all of the state capitals.

Mr. Collins exposed students to culture through senior trips to Paris and London. He advised the Student Council and National Honor Society. He introduced students to Albany through the Student Senate Policy forum. He stashed cookies in his desk drawer, and pretended not to notice when cookie crumbs trickled down the face of guilty students. His demonstrated finesse by teaching politeness, differentiating between the words “can and may” “Can I go to the bathroom?” “I don’t know, can you?”

He initiated our first relationship with the great outdoors by exposing students to their own backyard, the Adirondacks. There were the mandatory hikes with sixth grade teacher and partner-in-crime, Gary Baker. Yearly trips up Chimney Mountain to explore caves, steep terrain up to Blue Mountain, pushing students up Mt. Marcy, cross-country skiing and snowshoeing into Sargeant’s Ponds and the ultimate rite of passage: the fifth grade overnight. Destinations varied year to year… Kelly’s Point or Marcy Dam.

Mr. Collins, or Mr. C as he was affectionately known, encouraged kids who had never been into the wild to appreciate the natural experience. Rain or shine there were hikes. He tolerated whining, scraped knees, mud, inappropriate shoes, and general disinterest, able to turn apathy into curiosity. His infamous side trips often questioned by inquisitive young minds asking, “are we lost?” His confident response as branches hit his torso and neck, “we’re bushwhacking!” Relief etched on his face as soon as the lean-to appeared. He and wife Ellen always packed their tent to maintain peace and privacy. From his tent he would occasionally beckon “go to bed!” while students giggled and flicked flashlights on and off, amazed how quiet the woods actually were.

His laugh, his floppy hair, his passion and competitive game of kickball carried us through and made our brains work, for that we forgive his impatience and thank him for instilling us with fever for knowledge and an appreciation for what we may have ignored had he not been there to open the door.

Added 2017.
John Collins died on June 16, 2017. Today, June 24, 2017, an abundance of family, and friends gathered in Blue Mountain Lake and Long Lake to celebrate his exuberant life and the gifts he shared with so many. As his grandson said so eloquently today, “even the lake looks sad” It’s a quieter day in the Adirondacks.

Thank you Mr. C.

A collective history was compiled by the alumni of Long Lake Central School through Facebook. Memories from: Roberta Sutton McKinney, Jan Hunt, Maureen Rayome Turcotte, Scott Wight, Lynn Wight Stonier, Seth Baker, Melanie Boudreau Marcone, Michael Marcone and Alexandra Roalsvig.

Long Lake