Posts Taged long-lake-central-school

All About Bears in Long Lake, NY Adirondacks

FROM THE ARCHIVES: This post on bears was originally published on May 10, 2013.

All About Bears was a presentation given by Ben Tabor a wildlife biologist from the NYS DEC and KC Kelly a DEC Environmental Conservation Officer. This following information was from his talk at the Long Lake Community Connections evening held on May 9, 2013.

Bears are charismatic mega-fauna. Black bears as a rule are timid, shy and scared and not aggressive (FYI not the same for Black Bears in Canada). Black bears will mark their territory by biting trees, putting their scent on their territory and let other bears know.. “Hey bears, I’m in town, back away from my soft mass.” (code words for berries)

Bears are omnivores and tend to eat vegetarian, but they will eat meat. They are not big hunters, but don’t rule them out when it comes to finding prey, depends on the year and availability of food. Bears will eat berries, acorns, nuts, apples, succulent grasses, dandelions, skunk cabbage, jack in the pulpit, buds of hardwood trees and insects.

Generally bears are not social, but May and June are their breeding season and males and females can be seen together. Bears have delayed implantation so they will be fertilized in the spring, but will not implant the eggs until November. Bears breed every two years. Bears chemically decide how many cubs they have; it’s a combination of hormones, and body fat that makes that determination. All bears give birth on January 20th or 21st. Typical for Adirondack bears are broods of 2-3 cubs but Momma’s can produce from one to five bears and they can even have albinos (not to be mistaken for Polar Bears)

By August 1st the bears are weaned and ready to go off on their own. Sometimes a mom will let them den up with her for one more year, but come spring she sends them on their way. Bears are not adults until they are four years old. Most of the reports to the DEC involve younger bears that tend to get into trouble, whether they are climbing inside dumpsters or approaching someone’s home. If a bear doesn’t get into trouble with the DEC by age three they probably never will. Adult male bears are about 300 pounds and an adult Momma bear about 150 pounds.

Currently New York State boasts about 10,000 bears statewide. There is an effort to sustain the population, and the DEC monitors and develops hunting regulations and makes opportunities available to hunt bear based on the numbers, population and ability to sustain on natural food. The goal is to maintain the bear population for future generations, but to also ensure that the bears don’t become a nuisance to the general population. Bear hunting is a regulated harvest and it’s challenging to find a bear, much less haul it out of the woods, but benefits of bear include their meat which is a good source of protein, hide, fat (when rendered makes a heck of a pie) and the gall used for medicinal purposes. If you hunt bear, cook the meat to an internal temp of 137 degrees because they do carry trichinosis.

Safety tips
Don’t feed bears. A fed bear is a dead bear because once a bear finds a food source; they won’t back away until they’ve exhausted the food source. Bears will eat bird feeders; remove the feeders from April until November. Don’t be surprised if someone knocks on your door if they see bird feeders out and full during the off season.

What do you do if you see a bear? If you see a bear in a tree, don’t call to report it. Leave it alone, it got up the tree, it will come down, but you have to leave it alone. The bear is in the tree for safety.

The best thing to do be pre-emptive before anything escalates. Call Ray Brook DEC Wildlife 518 -897-1291 or 518-897-1326 to report bear disturbances. If you notice a bear peaking in your windows, or seems to be holding court on your property, eyeballing your activities that is not normal. Call the DEC. If you see a bear cross the road, let it be, but if there is a bear on or near your property that seems to be assessing and studying your property, call the DEC and report it.

The DEC keeps track of bears, their habitation, their habituation, and their environment. Whatever you do, don’t feed the bears. It’s against the law to feed bears. You will get ticketed and fined if you are caught feeding the bears. Don’t do it. You are putting your neighbors and the bear’s life at risk. Don’t make soup and leave it under your porch, don’t leave dog food or cat food outside. Use bear proof containers, or electric fences for large dumpsters.

Out west bear proof dumpsters are the norm and all over the place. In the East, the dumpster companies don’t provide bear proof dumpsters because there is no demand. Customers should be demanding Bear Proof Dumpsters because they are very effective, but consumers have to insist on the product for it to be made available on the east coast.

Already this year, 2013, it is extremely dry and the DEC has already had numerous reports of bear problems. Bears are attracted to residential garbage, dumpsters. Food hangs don’t work, don’t feed the dogs and cats outside, the bears will find their food.

No hand feeding or that bear will be in your house demanding food. He’ll break in, and he’ll wreck your house and he may even go to the bathroom in your home. The DEC will euthanize every single one of the hand fed bears. Don’t habituate bears because there is no rehabilitating bears once they are used to human contact.

Last summer the notorious Little Bear died among great controversy in Long Lake. Unfortunately a property owner who simply didn’t know that feeding would result in the bear’s death was feeding Little Bear. The bear feeding was happening because the bear was young, needy and hungry and the human felt bad for the bear. It was an honest mistake that can be corrected by education. The bear had become used to humans. After multiple sightings, the final straw occurred after the bear grabbed an ice cream cone out of a child’s hand at Stewarts. Bears are wild animals. They may be cute, and they may not hunt humans, but bears can and will swat at people if provoked and if they aren’t afraid because they’ve been used to human contact and human food.

Habituated bears will wander near roads and get hit by cars. Folks in the Adirondacks live in bear country so be respectful of the bears and be responsible. They couldn’t stress enough the importance of not leaving food out for the bears. A few years ago, in Old Forge, vehicles killed 19 bears. During hunting season only four bears were taken. Why did cars kill the bears? Because bears had found human food resources and they were living in and near the community and wandering around after dark and no one can see them at night because their fur absorbs all of the light.

How do you stop a bear from become too friendly or curious?
Remove the attraction, make noise, and use bear resistant cans when you hike or at home. The ways of the past has changed. Bears adapt and learn. Rubber buckshot at one time was commonly used to ward off and scare off bears. These days, rubber buckshot doesn’t work . The bears aren’t even scared of it. If they are hungry, they continue to eat their food. The DEC doesn’t move bears anymore because the bears will return and will travel great distances to get home. One bear that was moved out of a populated area was moved 80 miles from its home. It took several weeks, but due to tagging he was traced and returned back to his habitat after traveling 120 miles in the woods.

If you see a bear and it’s a menace call 897-1291 or 897-1326 and report it. Ben or KC will come out and address your bear issues. KC Kelly is the only DEC Encon officer in Northern Hamilton County so he has a lot of ground to cover, but he will respond. He also asked; if you have a neighbor, or see someone attracting bears to your neighborhood, anything unnatural, to call and report it. He just needs the address, not the name, so it takes a community to keep the bears safe.

Humans and bears should ignore each other. Long live the bears.

Article originally written and published by Alexandra Roalsvig May 10, 2013

Reunion and Town Celebration On Deck for September

Plans are underway for a four-day All Class Inclusive Long Lake Central School Reunion and Town Celebration event to be held Thursday, September 12 through Sunday, September 15th, 2019 at a variety of venues in and around the Long Lake area. Barbara Cragg Kiefer, Class President of Long Lake Central School Class of 1969 chairs the 2019 Reunion Committee.
 
This event initiated by the Class of 1969 to celebrate their 50th reunion also includes alumni from all the graduating classes from Long Lake Central School and residents of the Long Lake Community. Barbara Kiefer manages two Facebook groups with over with 319 members people interested in the event.  Kiefer and the reunion committee have been planning this event for over three years. While the group has been coordinating efforts on social media, Kiefer wants to ensure all alumni and residents, teachers and staff are included and invited. It is open to anyone who has a connection to the school and community. There are many activities available and everyone is welcome to pick and choose their favorites.
 
Planned events include:  Santanoni Wagon Trip, Trivia Night at the Adirondack Hotel, Golf, Alumni Assembly, Dance with the Adirondack DJ at the Long Lake Town Hall, Picnic at Mt. Sabattis, Open Mike, Karaoke at The Cellar, Formal Buffet dinner hosted at the Long View Lodge, Story Slam, Class Meetings and local church services.
 
Costs for the activities range per venue.  To sign up or for more detailed information about the reunion schedule please contact Barbara Kiefer via email at kieferba1@aol.comor check out the official Town of Long Lake website at www.mylonglakecom/schoolsfor the most updated schedule of events.  To register for the official class dinner on Saturday night tickets are available online at https://thelongviewlodge.com/llcsreunion
 
 
 
 
 

Long Laker Griffin Farr Showcases his Snowboard Style

2016 turned out to be an awesome winter for seven-year old snowboarder Griffin Farr. He took advantage of the varied terrain at slopes all around the Long Lake area. His treks included Jay Peak, Gore, Oak, and Smugglers Notch in Vermont. He was so excited about his excellent winter that he put togehter a highlight reel to show his friends at the Long Lake Central School Talent Show. He’s an insipration and we are thrilled that he shared his mad skills with us in this fun video.

Griffin Farr showcases his favorite Long Lake logo on his snowboard.

Griffin Farr showcases his favorite Long Lake logo on his snowboard.

Adirondack Quilt Camp 2014 Long Lake, NY

Long Lake NY hosts the 5th Annual Adirondack Quilt Camp at Long Lake Central School, June 29th thru July 2nd, 2014. Over 20 classes and twelve teachers, this years classes boast handwork, beginning quilting, the ever popular Mystery Quilt and many more.

On Monday Night at the Long Lake Library, at 5pm, Lorrie Hosley will be hosting a trunk show with over 50 Antiques Quiltsll-quilts-poster-web 2014. This presentation is open to the public.

Log Cabin Fabrics will be at the Long Lake Central School gym, daily, and it is open to the public from 9am – 4pm.

US Senators Schumer and Gillibrand Visit Long Lake NY

Long Lake, NY, August 12, 2011

US Senator’s Chuck Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand stopped by Long Lake Central School on Friday, August 12th as part of a whirlwind tour of the Adirondack North Country Region to meet with leaders from around the Adirondacks and to engage in conversation about jobs and the most vital issues facing Adirondack residents today.

On tap for the structured panel discussion included William Farber, Chairman of the Hamilton County Board of Supervisors, Brian Towers, President of the Adirondack Association of Towns and Villages, Mark Brand, Superintendent of Indian Lake Central School, Kate Fish, Executive Director of ANCA, Garry Douglas, President and CEO of the North Country Chamber of Commerce, and Ann Melious, Director of Economic Development and Tourism for Hamilton County.

Senators Schumer and Gillibrand outside Long Lake Central School

Kirsten Gillibrand arrived in the room first, shook everyone’s hand and made light of the fact that Chuck was still out in the hallway talking. Gillibrand opened up the discussion with her appreciation for everyone coming out to meet with them and cited the most important issue of the day: jobs.

Senator Schumer entered the room with Bill Farber and greeted everyone and remarked on the beauty of the area, the bustle of the town, the great weather and then the panel got down to business.

Bill Farber led the meeting, thanked Long Lake Central School for hosting the event then and called on the panelists to share their insights.

Brian Towers spoke first and gave both US Senators copies of the APRAP study. The report is the result of a two-year research effort by and for the communities of the Adirondack Park to provide a data-rich, factual baseline for discussion and planning of park issues at both the local and regional levels.

Schumer and Gillibrand at the Panel Discussion

Brian Towers touched upon the human desire of people who want to live in the Adirondack region because of the natural beauty, water, quality of life, small schools, but the lack of jobs has bled the region dry. He listed several ideas that included attracting innovative thinkers in rural development to the region, and the need to create and develop loan funds to support infrastructure. Other ideas included: the possibility of carbon credits, developing family friendly jobs focusing on biomass and to foster a way to encourage and reward private investment.

Mark Brand reminded Senator Schumer of previous visits to the Indian Lake Central School. Schumer remembered his visit fondly as he had a school lunch featuring fish sticks. After a moment of levity Mark Brand spoke about the schools in the immediate area. He emphasized the answer is not to consolidate schools, but to create opportunities out of challenges. Model the regional school districts as the Newcomb, NY school district has done, and to seek federal help to revise immigration laws to make it easier for smaller communities and public schools to host foreign students and limit unfunded mandates.

Kate Fish spoke about the Common Ground Alliance’s successful meeting held in July (in Long Lake at Mt. Sabattis) which is a cross-section of people in the Adirondacks with differing views. This year’s event the Common Ground participants were asked to rank potential workable ways to model a future for park residents and the overall consensus was to work on the model for the Sustainable Life, but for that to succeed it was vital to have broadband available in the region.

Garry Douglas outlined the potential revitalization of the historical train corridor route between Utica and Lake Placid with an emphasis on connecting to Tupper Lake. Douglas also mentioned the possibility of developing it as a recreational corridor, clarifying that trains and a viable recreation corridor for hiking, biking and snowmobiling would not be exclusive of the other.

Both Kate Fish and Garry Douglas touched upon the importance of broadband to the region and the topic elicited a big reaction and much interest from both Schumer and Gillibrand. The panel discussion veered off course so the senators could clarify the needs of the area. Where broadband is available now? Where wireless is available and if one was more viable to the region than the other depending on the area it was serving.

In Long Lake cell phone service is available from AT&T only and not Verizon. Long Lake does have DSL available and it is serviced by Frontier Communications. At this time the Town of Long Lake has plans for two wi-fi hot spots at both Mt. Sabattis Pavilion and the Long Lake Town Hall. Plans for implementation and timeline have not been released yet.

The broadband discussion emphasized the need for money to serve the last mile of broadband. The hardest challenge is the connection from a main hub to the local residents. Gillibrand is working on a farm bill and discussion on the agricultural committee is the consideration to put a requirement similar to the original telephone bill to make broadband service available and mandatory all across the country.

Senator Schumer with Ann Melious

Ann Melious from Hamilton County, NY spoke about the effort by the county to promote and attract younger families with children to move to the region. Hamilton County is starting a campaign to tap into what is most attractive about our area to live including: safety, scenery, sense of community, small schools and to encourage people to work from home. She sought support from the senators to consider the possibility of Hamilton County being part of a pilot program and model for rural communities across the nation.

Schumer and Gillibrand wanted to clarify that their job encompasses everything from big problems to small and they are here to serve the needs for everyone in New York State. Everyone is encouraged to contact their office with their thoughts, concerns or ideas. Schumer mentioned that the elimination of earmarks was tough on rural economies and directly effects those in the Adirondacks. “Getting rid of earmarks makes our job harder.”

Time was short, the itinerary was tight and the Senators took some photos with guests at Long Lake Central School. Once photo ops were completed they continued on their North Country Tour.

Senator Schumer, Long Lake Town Supervisor Clark Seaman, Senator Gillibrand

John Collins Former LLCS Teacher Honored

On, November 14, 2009 John Collins was awarded the honorable achievement, the Howard Zahniser Award by the organization, Protect the Adirondacks. He received this award for his efforts, courage, education and passion to protect the Adirondack Park & Catskill Park. I was asked to write something about his time teaching at Long Lake Central School and I thank all of you who generously shared some very funny memories and the following is a compilation of insights many friends shared, so I thank you. FYI Howard Zahniser was the author of the federal Wilderness Act of 1964. I was honored to be asked to write something for the program because Mr. C was a very important influence on my own personal history and on so many others who contributed to this compilation.

The following appeared in the program…
He made an indelible impression on the students passing through his classroom. He expected participation, and was often met with resistance, but he never gave up. He went out of his way to encourage those who didn’t embrace traditional modes of learning for hard labor, hammering nails, reading, physical exertion, or memorizing poetry.

He wore the part well, with a macramé belt, short sleeve print shirt and a cotton tie with a flat end, and he was often heard muttering, “don’t touch my tie.” He made us memorize “El Dorado,” “The Road Not Taken,” and all of the state capitals.

Mr. Collins exposed students to culture through senior trips to Paris and London. He advised the Student Council and National Honor Society. He introduced students to Albany through the Student Senate Policy forum. He stashed cookies in his desk drawer, and pretended not to notice when cookie crumbs trickled down the face of guilty students. His demonstrated finesse by teaching politeness, differentiating between the words “can and may” “Can I go to the bathroom?” “I don’t know, can you?”

He initiated our first relationship with the great outdoors by exposing students to their own backyard, the Adirondacks. There were the mandatory hikes with sixth grade teacher and partner-in-crime, Gary Baker. Yearly trips up Chimney Mountain to explore caves, steep terrain up to Blue Mountain, pushing students up Mt. Marcy, cross-country skiing and snowshoeing into Sargeant’s Ponds and the ultimate rite of passage: the fifth grade overnight. Destinations varied year to year… Kelly’s Point or Marcy Dam.

Mr. Collins, or Mr. C as he was affectionately known, encouraged kids who had never been into the wild to appreciate the natural experience. Rain or shine there were hikes. He tolerated whining, scraped knees, mud, inappropriate shoes, and general disinterest, able to turn apathy into curiosity. His infamous side trips often questioned by inquisitive young minds asking, “are we lost?” His confident response as branches hit his torso and neck, “we’re bushwhacking!” Relief etched on his face as soon as the lean-to appeared. He and wife Ellen always packed their tent to maintain peace and privacy. From his tent he would occasionally beckon “go to bed!” while students giggled and flicked flashlights on and off, amazed how quiet the woods actually were.

His laugh, his floppy hair, his passion and competitive game of kickball carried us through and made our brains work, for that we forgive his impatience and thank him for instilling us with fever for knowledge and an appreciation for what we may have ignored had he not been there to open the door.

Added 2017.
John Collins died on June 16, 2017. Today, June 24, 2017, an abundance of family, and friends gathered in Blue Mountain Lake and Long Lake to celebrate his exuberant life and the gifts he shared with so many. As his grandson said so eloquently today, “even the lake looks sad” It’s a quieter day in the Adirondacks.

Thank you Mr. C.

A collective history was compiled by the alumni of Long Lake Central School through Facebook. Memories from: Roberta Sutton McKinney, Jan Hunt, Maureen Rayome Turcotte, Scott Wight, Lynn Wight Stonier, Seth Baker, Melanie Boudreau Marcone, Michael Marcone and Alexandra Roalsvig.